sit unsteadily in one’s stomach

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jacdac

Senior Member
Lebanese
Sophie feels a sick horror over Rose’s revelation. The scrambled eggs sit unsteadily in her stomach. Rose is too pure and fragile to even say the word ‘rape’.
Source: The Last Anniversary by Liane Moriarty

Would a native speaker ever use this bolded expession? Or is it idiosyncratic for the author?

Thank you.
 
  • kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    I think it's something an author might say but a real person wouldn't have much reason to.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    Most of these types of questions you ask come from the narration and not the dialogue. I look at it from the point of view that no "real" people go around narrating their own or other people's lives so they just don't have a need to talk like that. And it's not even the characters talking like that. It's the narration, which would be extremely tedious if it sounded just like the characters. People are generally not particularly eloquent.

    I can imagine a real person saying, "something's not sitting well in my stomach" but I can't imagine them saying "unsteadily". I can imagine another author saying it, though.
     
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