sitting/finding a table in a restaurant

  • Monica610

    Senior Member
    Polish
    It depends on who you're talking to. If you talk to your friend that will be:

    1. Gdzie chcesz usiąść?
    2. Gdzie chciałbyś(male)/chciałabyś(female) usiąść?
    3. Jest wolny stolik w rogu.

    But if you're talking to older person that will be: "Gdzie chciałaby Pani/chciałby Pan usiąść?"

    I hope that will help you a little.
     

    SilverStardj

    Member
    English
    If talking informally, it's better to use:

    1. Gdzie pan (male) / pani (female) chce usiąść?
    2. Gdzie pan bychciał (male)/ pani bychciała(female) usiąść?
     

    Monica610

    Senior Member
    Polish
    It's "by chciał", not "bychciał" ;-) But it sounds a little strange for me - I would say rather "Gdzie chciałby Pan usiąść?" than "Gdzie Pan by chciał usiąść?". But they are both correct.
     

    Thomas1

    Senior Member
    polszczyzna warszawska
    Cześć,

    How would you say the following:

    (context = in a restaurant or any place)

    1. Where do you want to sit?
    2. Where would you like to sit?
    3. There is a table available in the corner.

    Dzękuję,
    Drei
    When I was working as a waiter we usually showed people thair tables (unless they reserved one in advance). Anyway, I would use your seceond version instead of the 1st one.
    I would employ:
    Gdzie chcieliby Państwo usiąść. (if you're talking to a couple or more people). If there was only one person I would use Monica610's suggestion:
    Monica610 said:
    But if you're talking to older person that will be: "Gdzie chciałaby Pani/chciałby Pan usiąść?"
    I wouldn't agree with one point Monica made here--this was (and still is) used to any person regardless to their age.
    On the other hand if you are speaking to a person who is, for instance, your guest or you simply want to show your respect/ be kind then use it to.

    Your context is quite broad since we usually use different constructions in a restaurant, bar, or at a banquet and different ones in familiar entourage in which you know the people you're going to spend some time with. So in relations--an employee vs. clients/guests we most often use would constructions (although, some contexts allow the plain forms too--and they don't go clunk), whereas talking to people whom we are on friendly basis we may allow ourselves to use more colloquial forms (Monica's two first suggestions).

    3. There is a table available in the corner.
    Mamy jeden wolny stolik w rogu (sali).
    Literally: We have a free table in the corner (of the restaurant).
    SilverStardj said:
    If talking informally, it's better to use:

    1. Gdzie pan (male) / pani (female) chce usiąść?
    2. Gdzie pan bychciał (male)/ pani bychciała(female) usiąść?
    An additional word to what Monica said. It still is formal as you used Pan/Pani forms. ;)

    Tom
     
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