sketch <out><throughout>

I sketched you that you gave to your mother.

I sketch out you that you gave to your mother.

I sketched throughout the pic of your mother that you sent me and you gave it to your mother.

Are all of them correct?
 
  • much_rice

    Senior Member
    English - American
    I'm sorry to say I don't understand any of these sentences. Can you use other words to explain what you're trying to say, or what the context is?
     
    I'm sorry to say I don't understand any of these sentences. Can you use other words to explain what you're trying to say, or what the context is?
    According to oxford dictionary sketch means
    "make a rough drawing of"
    example: as they talked, Modigliani began to sketch her.

    So I thought these sentences would be correct.

    "I drew your picture that you gave to your mother." Is this sentence correct?
     

    Tyrion Lann

    Senior Member
    INDIA -Hindi
    No, and second one is definitely not.
    Sketch something out : give a general description of something, giving only the basic facts.

    1. I sketched you, and you gave that to your mother.
    3. I sketched the pic of your mother, which you had sent me, and you gave that to your mother.
     

    much_rice

    Senior Member
    English - American
    Ah, but it was confusing because "sketch" has other meanings as well, and your sentences needed to have objects. This works:

    • I sketched the picture of you that you gave to your mother.
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    "I drew your picture that you gave to your mother." Is this sentence correct?
    No. You are trying to say too many things at once. These are correct sentences:

    I drew your picture.
    I drew the picture that you gave to your mother.
    I drew a picture of you, and you gave it to your mother.
    I drew your picture, and you gave the picture to your mother.
     
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