Skivvy-wearing cappuccino drinking tree-huggers

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Mossa

Senior Member
France French
Hi,

I'm kind of stuck on the translation into French of that sentence :

"The closure of the timber mill was the greatest piece of bureaucratic bungling by a pack of soft-hearted, communist sympathizing, city dwelling, skivvy-wearing, cappuccino-drinking tree-huggers."

I don't really understand how skivvies (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polo_neck) and cappuccino-drinking are related to tree-huggers.

I understand it's a cliche of environmentalists but is it because these people wear outdoor clothes and drink coffee to keep themselves warm when they're on a protest (to save trees for instance) ? Or is the skivvy here just to make fun of the way they dress ?

Thanks a lot for your help
 
  • panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    The references to skivvies, coffee and trees are not specifically related to behaviour on protests. They are more in the series of descriptors that the writer uses to caricature the people he is writing about. It appears to me that these are not the actively-protesting environmentalists; they are the affluent middle-class who no doubt park their gas-guzzling 4x4s just around the corner from the environmental protests they consider it chic to attend.
     

    Ann O'Rack

    Senior Member
    UK
    UK English
    Just being really picky here, does anyone else think there are a couple of hyphens missing from the original quote?
     

    Mossa

    Senior Member
    France French
    Just being really picky here, does anyone else think there are a couple of hyphens missing from the original quote?
    I guess everybody would have understood that but here you go ::)
    "The closure of the timber mill was the greatest piece of bureaucratic bungling by a pack of soft-hearted, communist-sympathizing, city-dwelling, skivvy-wearing, cappuccino-drinking tree-huggers."
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    The quote sounds like a play on words from a track called "Judge Hanging" on a record album of about 1970 entitled "1200 Hamburgers to Go" by comedian Don Imus that strung out a list of pejorative adjectives. (Sorry, but I can't find the original on the Internet)

    I go with hyphenating everything.
     

    Mossa

    Senior Member
    France French
    The quote sounds like a play on words from a track called "Judge Hanging" on a record album of about 1970 entitled "1200 Hamburgers to Go" by comedian Don Imus that strung out a list of pejorative adjectives. (Sorry, but I can't find the original on the Internet)

    I go with hyphenating everything.

    OK, thanks. I'll look into it.
     
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