slag off to the ground

Paulfromitaly

MODerator
Italian
Hello,

I heard this expression:

Don't slag her off to the ground!

Does it mean "don't slag her off so badly" or "don't slag her off among the people"? Shouldn't it be "on the ground" in the latter case?
 
  • CatStar

    Senior Member
    English, Ireland
    Hey Paul,

    I haven't heard this expression before but I would say that it should be off the ground, without the to.
    And I would say that it means don't slag her off so badly.

    But as I said I haven't heard it before, so maybe others have more informed opinions.

    Cat
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    Hello,

    I heard this expression:

    Don't slag her off to the ground!

    Does it mean "don't slag her off so badly" or "don't slag her off among the people"? Shouldn't it be "on the ground" in the latter case?
    I haven't heard it either, so I'm only guessing. I've heard people add "to the ground" to other things to mean "completely/utterly" as in a house that burns to the ground, leaving nothing (which is probably a lot more common in the U.S. with our wood-frame construction than in Italy with your beautiful stone houses. :) )

    My guess is that the speaker means "completely" in this context.
     

    CatStar

    Senior Member
    English, Ireland
    I haven't heard it either, so I'm only guessing. I've heard people add "to the ground" to other things to mean "completely/utterly" as in a house that burns to the ground, leaving nothing (which is probably a lot more common in the U.S. with our wood-frame construction than in Italy with your beautiful stone houses. :) )

    My guess is that the speaker means "completely" in this context.
    Oh ya, had forgotten about that. Like when you say:
    That job suits her right down to the ground
    it means she's really good at it and really likes it.

    I guess then slagged her off to the ground would work then because off goes with the verb (to slag off) and then the to the ground expression comes so the two prespositions make sense when put together.

    Hope I haven't confused you now,;)
    Cat
     

    Paulfromitaly

    MODerator
    Italian
    Oh ya, had forgotten about that. Like when you say:
    That job suits her right down to the ground
    it means she's really good at it and really likes it.

    I guess then slagged her off to the ground would work then because off goes with the verb (to slag off) and then the to the ground expression comes so the two prespositions make sense when put together.

    Hope I haven't confused you now,;)
    Cat
    You haven't confused me at all.:)
    It probably was meant to be " slag her off down to the ground", but it'd sound not as smooth as with down omitted, hence the speaker's choice in an informal conversation.
     
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