Slanted lines / Sloping lines / Diagonal lines

ridgemao

Senior Member
Chinese - Mandarin
Hello:

What should I call these straight lines in this picture(link1, link2) ? They go at the same angle.

1. Slanted lines.
"slanted line" is good for a pattern.

2. Sloping lines.
"sloping line" can be used in the graph of a math function, or for tangible physical things as in, "The ground sloped gently down to the stream"
But can it be used for a pattern like this?

3. Diagonal lines.
"diagonal line" can mean any straight line which goes at an angle, even it doesn't join two opposite corners of a rectangle.

Are the above three choices all correct?

Thank you.
 
  • PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    I would call them slanting lines. (Seven, vertically stacked, parallel, black lines slanting up from left to right.)
     

    m0nchichi

    Senior Member
    Why not diagonal ? I always confuse slanting , sloping, inclining, etc. with diagonal if it's just about lines. We have a sign on the autobahn in Germany with "diagonal" lines in a circle which means no speed limit. I never heard someone saying "the sign with the slanted lines ". So is it just personal preference to call it slanted or diagonal ?
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    A diagonal (noun) usually is an interior line of a polygon or circle/oval, etc, reaching from one side to the other (other than horizontally or vertically) and passing though the centre of the figure or thereabouts. It is from this sense that diagonal (adj.) comes.

    As the lines shown had no boundary, "diagonal" does not seem appropriate: they are not diagonal to anything.
    So is it just personal preference to call it slanted
    The preference is for "slanting". :thumbsup:
     

    m0nchichi

    Senior Member
    A diagonal (noun) usually is an interior line of a polygon or circle/oval, etc, reaching from one side to the other (other than horizontally or vertically) and passing though the centre of the figure or thereabouts. It is from this sense that diagonal (adj.) comes.

    As the lines shown had no boundary, "diagonal" does not seem appropriate: they are not diagonal to anything.The preference is for "slanting". :thumbsup:
    Makes sense and is noted! Thanks :)
     
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