Slavic languages, seznam

Ben Jamin

Senior Member
Polish
I have recently discovered that both Czech and Slovenian use the word "seznam" to denote a list or register. What is the origin of this word, and how come they are identical in both languages? Did it develop from a common Slavic root, or is it a loan from Czech to Slovenian or vice versa?
 
  • dihydrogen monoxide

    Senior Member
    Slovene, Serbo-Croat
    According to the Slovenian Etymological Dictionary, the word is a loanword from Czech and it's se vocalized counterpart and znam 'known', a passive form.
     

    vianie

    Senior Member
    Slovak
    According to the Slovenian Etymological Dictionary, the word is a loanword from Czech and it's se vocalized counterpart and znam 'known', a passive form.
    Slovak has borrowed it from Czech as well, and like thousands and thousands of bohemisms it went through the slovakisation process, so it looks "zoznam" now.
     

    dihydrogen monoxide

    Senior Member
    Slovene, Serbo-Croat
    Do you know where I can find a list of bohemisms in Slovenian.

    I don't know if there is such a book out there, but I know there is a book of false friends between Slovene and Slovak. From my university days, I remember that an old word for grammatical number was čislo.
     

    vianie

    Senior Member
    Slovak
    Which is a bit strange, since Slovenian also has other such se- words, such as seznaniti (se), sestopiti, sestreliti, etc. Are they all loaned from Czech?
    Ne vem. :(

    They all obviously appear in Czech as well: seznámit se, sestoupit, sestřelit (and correspond to zoznámiť sa, zostúpiť, zostreliť in Slovak).
     
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