Slime trail

Svalbard

Member
french
Hello,

I'd like to have an Anglo-Saxon point of view.
Does the expression "slime trail" or "slime track" inspire a bit of disgust or is it neutral? Is it familiar?
From my native-French point of view, it does inspire me a little bit of disgust.

I'm talking about the slime that a snail or a slug would leave behind. Btw, is "slime track" and "slime trail" the correct expression?

Cheers,

Svd
 
  • suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    Slime has negative
    connotations for me. Maybe not for snails themselves, as it serves a purpose for them, allowing them to glide about ... but for the rest of us it denotes evidence of things we don't like, such as slugs or things going rotten. 'Foul' is part of the definition.
     

    Svalbard

    Member
    french
    Thanks for the feedback.
    So you would say that slug would have a negative connotation as well?
    Also, could "slime" be used in any other meaning than when linked with snails or slugs?
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Don't forget fish slime.

    "Slime" can refer to the disgusting nature of the slick, gooey substance at hand, whatever its source.

    Outside of the laboratory and/or biology books, I can't see it as being anything but repulsive.A

    As an added note, I now remember that the Mattel company once produced a disgusting toy called Slime to the merriment of many youngsters.
     
    Last edited:

    Svalbard

    Member
    french
    Wow. Many thanks for these answers!
    I see the word slime as is doesn't sound too nice then.
    What about its adjective - slimy? I find it quite cute as a matter of fact.
    As is "slimy trail". Would that expression sound more likeable to your Anglo-Saxon ears?
    Cheers
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    "...still with the fresh fig in his mouth he ran his tongue over her naked body, leaving a slimy trail on her..."

    Now if you are into that kind of thing you might find it rather "cute". As I think I said somewhere else, "context is all".

    By the way, as an Englishwoman I really don't like to be called an "Anglo-Saxon".
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    Nah, that's not working for me, Velisarius!
    Then, if we're talking identity, as a lesbian I really don't like to be covered in male-slime.

    Context makes a difference, but in the context of something slippy, if you don't want people to be repulsed you find a better word than slime for the substance in question.
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    :D My point ewie is that something slimy like figs or okra can be enjoyable, though not necessarily in my context. It's a matter of taste.
     

    Svalbard

    Member
    french
    Thank you All for the input!
    I'm sure there is a nice expression for slime trail, though. When talking about a snail or a slug, would there be a nice synonym of "slime trail" or "slimy trail"? I hear that context is everything, but most of you think that slime cannot be seen as something nice, no matter the context.
    When looking at this cute picture, I cannot believe that there is no such expression in the English language, which can describe in a positive way the shiny trail that a snail/slug leaves behind it.

    http://fc05.deviantart.net/fs70/i/2010/080/d/e/Slime_Trail_by_KitsuneCookie.jpg
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    but most of you think that slime cannot be seen as something nice, no matter the context.
    So does the WRD dictionary


    WordReference Random House Learner's Dictionary of American English © 2014
    slim•y /ˈslaɪmi/ adj., -i•er, -i•est.of, like, or relating to slime.
    covered with or full of slime:slimy footprints.
    causing a feeling of disgust; disgusting;
    repulsive:
    She told him to keep his slimy hands off her.
     

    Enquiring Mind

    Senior Member
    English - the Queen's
    You don't say why (in what context) you want to use the word (or image). Could you avoid much of the unpleasant connotation by just omitting the world "slime" and saying "slug trail" or "snail trail"?
    But "slime" is definitely yucky. Many people (though I'm not one of them) would like to eat a hamburger/beefburger (-cum horseburger :D), but very few want to eat a pink slime burger (which can sometimes be more or less the same thing).
     

    Svalbard

    Member
    french
    Many thanks to the Community for all the inputs!
    I will stick to Ewie's "Silvery/slithery trail". Beautifully put!
    Cheers
     

    Svalbard

    Member
    french
    I have one last question for this thread:
    which would be correct, speaking of a snail trail: "silver trail" or "silvery trail"? Or can both work? Isn't "silvery trail" too formal?
     

    Ann O'Rack

    Senior Member
    UK
    UK English
    Either would be fine, though "silvery" sounds rather more poetic - but this might be what you're trying to achieve. "Shiny" would also be fine, as it just describes what it looks like without being either positive or negative.
     

    ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    I deliberately chose silvery rather than silver because it's prettier:) (and I suggested silvery slithery ~ the two together ~ because
    they're approaching onomatopoeia:):))
     
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