slink and slouch

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Nastya1976

Senior Member
Russian
What is "slink and slouch", please?

1. But other people's experiences belie this understanding. For example, Walsh's son Kenny had by age forty pawned all of his tools and his wife's jewelry to get cash. People slink and slouch into pawnshops so that they can buy food, pay bills and rent, fix the car, replace bald tires, visit a clinic, or fund Christmas and birthdays ...

"The New Poverty Studies
The Ethnography of Power, Politics and Impoverished People in the United State"

  • Edited by Judith G. Goode
    • and
    • Jeff Maskovsky
    2. They slink and slouch, glide and slither, and they have an interest in certain people, especially in those who will soon die by violence and also in those who will murder them. I've long believed that bodachs feed on human misery, which is why they appear at sites of forthcoming mass murders, where deadly fires will burn, ...
    Dean Koontz "Deeply Odd: An Odd Thomas Novel"


    3. She liked to savor a city at leisure and at length, to arrive by train, preferably with the sun just coming up and to sit by herself on the platform for a few minutes, observing the purposeful strides of the commuters, the slink and slouch of the derelicts and whores, the foreign tourists, often timid and unsure, and trying not to look so, but uncertain of the language or the proper direction in which to forge, and feeling their way with caution in an alien terrain.
    Lucy Taylor "The Safety of Unknown Cities"

    https://nyupress.org/author/4100

 
  • Nastya1976

    Senior Member
    Russian
    It's just "slink" and "slouch." It's not an idiom or a compound phrase. Which of the words is giving you problems?
    slink

    I can't imagine slink and slouch. Especially '"slink''. How does "slink and slouch" look like?
    Thank you.
     

    Glenfarclas

    Senior Member
    English (American)
    Well, there are two definitions of "slink" (from our dictionary):
    1. to move or go in a sneaky manner, as from fear or shame: After those insulting remarks he slunk quietly away.
    2. to walk in a sinuous way that draws attention, esp. sexual attention: She slinked into the room and every man's eyes were upon her.
    Here's a man slinking "in a sneaky manner":

     
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