slipped his biscuit

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PeterPT

Senior Member
Portuguese - Portugal
Hi everyone, I need help to understand this one.

Two people talking:

"I mean, he even helped
me clean it up afterwards."

"Which is more than I could
say for Odin Quincannon."

"I mean, he has once and for all
and finally slipped his biscuit."

[slipped his biscuit] Is this an expression? I hope biscuit is not what I am thinking:D


Thank you all in advance
 
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  • dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    "Slipped his biscuit" is not an expression in AmE. I know of no meaning for that phrase.

    From the way it is used in the story, it appears to mean "he has gone crazy".

    Is this a book I might find online, to look further? What it the book name and author?
     

    PeterPT

    Senior Member
    Portuguese - Portugal
    dojibear, thanks for your replay. No, this is not from a book, this is from the TV show "Preacher" (NBC), season 01 episode 04.
    The guy in this conversation had been with this Odin Quincannon early on that day.
    They were talking about business and that ended up with Odin Quincannon pissing (literally) over
    this guy's suitcase.

    I hope this can help
     

    PeterPT

    Senior Member
    Portuguese - Portugal
    Keith Bradford, thank you so much, both of you.
    I think it makes sense to me, too.

    By the way, this show is awesome, although a little bit
    perverted, controversial, I guess.

    Thanks again
    Cheers
     
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    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    Is this Cassidy speaking? He has a very thick Irish accent and says things in ways which seem meant to make both the characters and the audience say "Oooh, he's so foreign! I can't understand a word he says."
     

    PeterPT

    Senior Member
    Portuguese - Portugal
    Is this Cassidy speaking? He has a very thick Irish accent and says things in ways which seem meant to make both the characters and the audience say "Oooh, he's so foreign! I can't understand a word he says."
    Eheheh, I agree on that, but that's Annville's Mayor.
     

    You little ripper!

    Senior Member
    Australian English
    You little ripper!, thanks for your replay.
    Slip and flip, have different meanings, am I right?

    Freak out, gone mad or gone crazy it's all the same for me.
    'Slip' and 'flip' do have different meanings, Peter, but there's only one letter that differs between them. Perhaps the transcriber heard 'slipped' instead of 'flipped' (which is what it should have been).
     
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    PeterPT

    Senior Member
    Portuguese - Portugal
    It's slipped, definitely.

    I am fully clarified because of your help.
    Thank you all.

    Cheers
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    I think such a slangy expression is vague, not well-defined and precise. So if someone says "slip" instead of "flip", they are probably using the same expression. And there are not a lot of slang expressions using "biscuit". There's.....nope, I can't think of any.

    Ripper-san, thanks for finding the urban dictionary reference. "Freaked out" makes more sense than the "went crazy" I suggested.

    They were talking about business and that ended up with Odin Quincannon pissing (literally) over this guy's suitcase.
    Peter, do you know the English word "yuck"? Very useful word. Example sentence: Yuck!
     

    Keith Bradford

    Senior Member
    English (Midlands UK)
    ... And there are not a lot of slang expressions using "biscuit". There's.....nope, I can't think of any...
    Really, Dojibear? Well that just about takes the biscuit!

    Sorry, I'm afraid there are scores of them, mostly of minority interest, but they include the meanings shoes, buttocks, girlfriend, cannabis, idiot... See my sources in #4.
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    Really, Dojibear? Well that just about takes the biscuit!

    Sorry, I'm afraid there are scores of them, mostly of minority interest, but they include the meanings shoes, buttocks, girlfriend, cannabis, idiot... See my sources in #4.
    Thanks for the link. Interesting list. It looks like most of them are British...or urban...or from Michigan. That explains why I've never heard them. Around here "biscuit" doesn't even mean "a cookie or cracker". But your list makes me curious. How do you say "I wore shoes to kick my idiotic cannabis-smoking girlfriend in the buttocks"? Is that just "Biscuits!"? Never mind, t's a rhetorical question (which is probably another meaning of "biscuit").
     
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