slippery <in touch/ to touch / to the touch>

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What should be used:
Bases are slippery to touch .
Or
Bases are slippery to the touch .
Or
Bases are slippery in touch .
Which one of the above sounds natural?
Thank you
 
  • Barque

    Banned
    Tamil
    Like acid and bars, like soap(a base)
    I think the OP means "base" as used in chemistry - substances like sodium hydroxide that react with acids to form the class of compounds called salts.

    Abcd123kk, bases are used to make soap but that doesn't make soap a base, though it might be more basic than acidic. In any case, the word "base" with this meaning isn't normally used in everyday speech, so you'd do well to explain what you mean when you use such words.

    I suppose "bars" in your post is a typo for "base". (Please check your posts before posting. We often aren't sure what you mean because of the typos in your posts.)
     
    Last edited:
    Okay .
    Context:
    Acids and bases are the ones from chemistry.
    Acids like , citric acid , tartaric acid , oxalic acid, hydrochloric acid, sulphuric acid etc.
    Bases like Sodium hydroxide , calcium hydroxide etc.
    And now the question :
    You probably want "to the touch," but since you haven't provided context we don't even know what "bases" means here.
    So I have provided context now.
    So Newt what do you think? Will you use "to the touch"?
    Slippery here means that bases feel slippery when we touch them .
    So what should be used?
     

    DonnyB

    Sixties Mod
    English UK Southern Standard English
    Well, "bases" is completely the wrong word to use there, because sodium hydroxide, particularly, isn't "slippery to the touch", it's highly caustic and can cause severe burns. :eek::eek:

    If you change it to soap, which is what has already been suggested to you, then "to [the] touch" will work, but not "in touch".
     
    If you change it to soap, which is what has already been suggested to you, then "to [the] touch" will work, but not "in touch".
    So 'the ' is in the square brackets So does that mean that I can either include it or exclude , it won't make much difference?
    Like:
    Bases are slippery to touch/slippery to the touch.
    Either cab be used.
     
    Last edited:

    DonnyB

    Sixties Mod
    English UK Southern Standard English
    So 'the ' is in the square brackets So does that mean that I can either include it or exclude , it won't make much difference?
    Like:
    Bases are slippery to touch/slippery to the touch.
    Either can be used.
    That's what the brackets denote, yes - but once again, do not use the word "bases" anywhere in that sentence!

    You can say either:
    Soap is slippery to touch
    or
    Soap is slippery to the touch :)
     
    Nope, we don't but we are taught that bases are slippery and have a soapy texture, though with a warning that we cannot touch them due to their corrosive nature.
     
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