Slot machines

Penyafort

Senior Member
Catalan (Catalonia), Spanish (Spain)
How are slot machines, when used for gambling, called in your languages? Are there any colloquial terms for them and what do they mean?

I see that the words for them tend to explain quite graphically the fact that you're being robbed.

English: one-armed bandit (it robs you with just one arm)​
Spanish: tragaperras (literally, cash-swallower)​
Catalan: escurabutxaques (literally, pocket-cleaner or pocket-emptier)​

What about in your language?
 
  • TheCrociato91

    Senior Member
    Italian - Northern Italy
    In Italian, the most common way to refer to them is by using the English word slot machine. However, I've checked the Wikipedia entry for slot machine and it says:

    La slot machine, in italiano chiamata spesso macchina mangiasoldi, è un sistema di gioco d'azzardo comune nei casinò, nei bar, nelle case da gioco, nei centri scommesse e ora anche online.

    Macchina mangiasoldi literally means money-eating machine. I don't know how common this expression is, though. Wikipedia says that slot machines are often called that, but I'm not sure I agree. It may have been more common in the past.
     
    Greek:

    (1) «Κουλοχέρης» [ku.lɔˈçe.ɾis] (masc.) --> one-armed, lit. maimed of arm < compound: MoGr adj. «κουλός» [kuˈlɔs] --> disabled, maimed (of hand, arm) < Koine adj. «κυλλός» kŭllós --> deformed, crippled, crooked (of hand, foot) (probably from PIE *kʷel-/*kʷl-no- to turn/turn outward or inward cf Skt. चरति (carati), to wander, Lat. colere) + MoGr neut. noun «χέρι» [ˈçe.ɾi] --> hand < Classical 3rd declension feminine noun «χείρ» kʰeí̯r (nom. sing.), «χειρός» kʰei̯rós (gen. sing.).

    (2) «Ληστής» [liˈstis] (masc.) --> robber < Classical masc. noun «ληϊστήρ/λῃστήρ» leïstḗr and le̩stḗr, later «λῃστής» lē̩stḗs (masc.) --> plunderer, robber < Classical fem. noun «λείᾱ» leí̯ā < «*λᾱϝίᾱ» *lāwíā --> booty, spoils (PIE *leh₂u- to capture, seize cf Lat. lucrum, Proto-Germanic *launą > Ger. Lohn, Dt. loon).

    (1) prevails by far.
     

    Yendred

    Senior Member
    Français - France
    English: one-armed bandit (it robs you with just one arm)
    In French: bandit manchot (it comes from the English term of course).
    9782884710145_cg.jpg


    Note that, oddly enough, French manchot can both mean one-arm or armless... :eek:
    The Académie française must have thought the slight difference wasn't worth a specific word :D
     
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    merquiades

    Senior Member
    English (USA Northeast)
    How are slot machines, when used for gambling, called in your languages? Are there any colloquial terms for them and what do they mean?

    English: one-armed bandit (it robs you with just one arm)​
    Never heard of this expression, just slot machine or fruit machine (I guess because you have to get 3 fruits in a row to win). Also we use the verb feed. To feed the slot.
     

    Stoggler

    Senior Member
    UK English
    Never heard of this expression, just slot machine or fruit machine (I guess because you have to get 3 fruits in a row to win). Also we use the verb feed. To feed the slot.

    I think the everyday name for these machines in British English is fruit machine. I can’t recall the last time I heard someone use one-armed bandit, it’s a dated term and one that my parents used in their younger days but no more; British fruit machines haven’t had the arm at the side to make the wheels inside the machine start turning for decades now (since at least the 80s) so the name one-armed bandit no longer applies.
     
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    Penyafort

    Senior Member
    Catalan (Catalonia), Spanish (Spain)
    Thanks for the replies! It looks like 'eating money' is one of the generalized colloquial concepts for these machines.

    Never heard of this expression, just slot machine or fruit machine (I guess because you have to get 3 fruits in a row to win). Also we use the verb feed. To feed the slot.

    I admit I included it more for its meaning rather than for its current usage. As Stoggler says, it seems to have been applied to those machines which had that one arm, which makes sense. What I've found quite interesting is to see the expression copied in other languages.
     

    Jennifer Weiss

    Senior Member
    How are slot machines, when used for gambling, called in your languages? Are there any colloquial terms for them and what do they mean?

    I see that the words for them tend to explain quite graphically the fact that you're being robbed.

    English: one-armed bandit (it robs you with just one arm)​
    Spanish: tragaperras (literally, cash-swallower)​
    Catalan: escurabutxaques (literally, pocket-cleaner or pocket-emptier)​

    What about in your language?
    Not my language but in Turkish:

    1) Slot makinesi (slot machine);
    2) Para makinesi (money machine);
    3) Kumar makinesi (gambling machine);
     

    Linnets

    Senior Member
    In Italian, the most common way to refer to them is by using the English word slot machine.
    True, but we usually abbreviate the word and call it simply slot, pronounced quite different from English: [zlɔt] instead of [slɒt] (also final t is different, dental instad of alveolar and with audible release).

    Macchina mangiasoldi literally means money-eating machine. I don't know how common this expression is, though. Wikipedia says that slot machines are often called that, but I'm not sure I agree. It may have been more common in the past.
    I think it might be somewhat old-fashioned, but can be found in dictionaries such as Zingarelli.

    British fruit machines haven’t had the arm at the side to make the wheels inside the machine start turning for decades now (since at least the 80s) so the name one-armed bandit no longer applies.
    Also in Italy slot machines do not have the arm, just buttons.
     
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    I think the everyday name for these machines in British English is fruit machine. I can’t recall the last time I heard someone use one-armed bandit, it’s a dated term and one that my parents used in their younger days but no more; British fruit machines haven’t had the arm at the side to make the wheels inside the machine start turning for decades now (since at least the 80s) so the name one-armed bandit no longer applies.
    In Greece too, the modern slot machine doesn't have the single lever, but buttons. And it's also called «φρουτάκια» [fruˈta.ca] (neut. nom. pl.) --> little fruits (for obvious reasons). Yet, the name «κουλοχέρης» [ku.lɔˈçe.ɾis] (masc. nom. sing.) --> maimed of hand, one-armed is still preferred as the generic one, regardless of the type of the machine used
     
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