Slouch and Slump

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Artrella

Banned
BA
Spanish-Argentina
" Slouch and slump, Malachy waited in the dole queue for hours"

People, please, I want to know if this sentence is correct. Teacher said that "slouch and slump" is a compound which means "depressed". But I don't know if I have to write "Slouch and Slump" or use "ed". I can say "slumped" but I'm not sure about "slouchED".

A helping hand please! Art
 
  • Artrella

    Banned
    BA
    Spanish-Argentina
    Artrella said:
    " Slouch and slump, Malachy waited in the dole queue for hours"

    People, please, I want to know if this sentence is correct. Teacher said that "slouch and slump" is a compound which means "depressed". But I don't know if I have to write "Slouch and Slump" or use "ed". I can say "slumped" but I'm not sure about "slouchED".

    A helping hand please! Art

    I need an answer....
     

    Cal

    New Member
    U.S. of A/English-lots of Spanish
    Artrella,
    Is the sentence that you ask about: "Teacher said that "slouch and slump" is a compound which means "depressed?". Could you use some punctuation to clear this up? The paragraph is ambiguous.
    Is it you who is asking about "slouch and slump" and "depressed"? or is it someone who is narrating the sentence above and which you are quoting?
     

    Artrella

    Banned
    BA
    Spanish-Argentina
    Cal said:
    Artrella,
    Is the sentence that you ask about: "Teacher said that "slouch and slump" is a compound which means "depressed?". Could you use some punctuation to clear this up? The paragraph is ambiguous.
    Is it you who is asking about "slouch and slump" and "depressed"? or is it someone who is narrating the sentence above and which you are quoting?

    Here I go again! The sentence I want you to tell me if it's ok is this:

    "Slouch and slump, Malachy waited in the dole queue for an hour"
    Clear now Cal? :D
     

    jacinta

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Artrella said:
    " Slouch and slump, Malachy waited in the dole queue for hours"

    People, please, I want to know if this sentence is correct. Teacher said that "slouch and slump" is a compound which means "depressed". But I don't know if I have to write "Slouch and Slump" or use "ed". I can say "slumped" but I'm not sure about "slouchED".

    A helping hand please! Art

    I have no idea what this means!! The dole queue is British for what Americans call the welfare line. What your teacher means by compound word I really haven't a clue. Is this a British term? Slouch and slump? I understand the words separately but not as a compound word.
     

    Artrella

    Banned
    BA
    Spanish-Argentina
    jacinta said:
    I have no idea what this means!! The dole queue is British for what Americans call the welfare line. What your teacher means by compound word I really haven't a clue. Is this a British term? Slouch and slump? I understand the words separately but not as a compound word.

    MY TEACHER!!! She says that "slouch and slump" is a compound sth (invention????) meaning "depressed". Reasons: Slouch means your back is bent (for her this shows depression) and slump= laziness, so in the whole the phrase conveys the idea of DEPRESSION!!! (i'm not going to sleep tonight, it's 2:32 am and I have already had 20000000 mugs of coffee!!! and tomorrow I'll sit the exam!!!) MY TEACHER!!! (&%$#"?&@@)
    DOLE= money for the unemployed
    I agree with you, I COUL NOT FIND IT ANYWHERE IN THE WHOLE WORLD (IDA Y VUELTA!!)
    Anyway thank you very much Jacinta!!! Art :p :) :p
     

    jacinta

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Art, don't worry. Slouch and slump would give the connotation of someone who is depressed. It is not a usual phrase. But if she (your teacher) wants it to mean depressed, then let her think that. She's not that far off.
     

    Artrella

    Banned
    BA
    Spanish-Argentina
    jacinta said:
    Art, don't worry. Slouch and slump would give the connotation of someone who is depressed. It is not a usual phrase. But if she (your teacher) wants it to mean depressed, then let her think that. She's not that far off.

    Thx Jacinta... now I'm going to sleep... tomorrow we'll see... See ya!!!
    Art
     

    Cal

    New Member
    U.S. of A/English-lots of Spanish
    It's clear now. Thank you.

    "Slouch and slump" describes physically and concretely Malachy's posture over time, while waiting in line. The connotation is that Malachy was stooped, hunched over, using minimum energy to stand. Yes, your teacher read into this phrase that it also conveyed Malachy's emotional and spiritual state, which could have been "depressed" from having to go through this ordeal of waiting for welfare. Being on welfare, to Malachy, may be a depressing, hopeless state of affairs for him. Your teacher is giving her subjective opinion, and she is not actually wrong, as someone already has said.

    "But slouch and slump", by itself, does not mean depressed. I am around students who slouch and slump in their seats, and I have to remind them to "sit up and back straight". Yes, their posture in their seats is a sign of lack of energy, lack of interest, a depression of energy; but not necessarily a deep-set, long-term, or spiritual, emotional, or clinical depression.
    "Slouch and slump"-- head down, withdrawn from the world or into oneself, making oneself smaller. Yes, as a literay interpretation, Malachy might be depressed in his situation, maybe emotionally.
    I think the phrase (without other context) is the writer's way of creating atmosphere and tone in the passage. The reader pictures a man waiting, penniless, poor, without hope, much like in the image of the old black-and-white films showing hundreds of men during the (here's that word) the Depression of the 1930's. Most of them are "slouched and slumped". If the writer of that sentence you give as example used the present-tensed "slouch and slump", he did that as a literary device, similar to this example in Spanish:

    "Come y come, Alejandro no paró de cenar hasta las onze de la noche."

    As far as being a compound, it may be in British English, though in the US it be might considered a done phrase, like "back and forth", "this and that", or "hurry up and wait". But compound may mean a fixed phrase in England rather and a word made up of two words as it does in the US.


    I hope this explains some things. I think you went to sleep. Did you?
     

    Artrella

    Banned
    BA
    Spanish-Argentina
    Cal said:
    It's clear now. Thank you.

    "Slouch and slump" describes physically and concretely Malachy's posture over time, while waiting in line. The connotation is that Malachy was stooped, hunched over, using minimum energy to stand. Yes, your teacher read into this phrase that it also conveyed Malachy's emotional and spiritual state, which could have been "depressed" from having to go through this ordeal of waiting for welfare. Being on welfare, to Malachy, may be a depressing, hopeless state of affairs for him. Your teacher is giving her subjective opinion, and she is not actually wrong, as someone already has said.

    "But slouch and slump", by itself, does not mean depressed. I am around students who slouch and slump in their seats, and I have to remind them to "sit up and back straight". Yes, their posture in their seats is a sign of lack of energy, lack of interest, a depression of energy; but not necessarily a deep-set, long-term, or spiritual, emotional, or clinical depression.
    "Slouch and slump"-- head down, withdrawn from the world or into oneself, making oneself smaller. Yes, as a literay interpretation, Malachy might be depressed in his situation, maybe emotionally.
    I think the phrase (without other context) is the writer's way of creating atmosphere and tone in the passage. The reader pictures a man waiting, penniless, poor, without hope, much like in the image of the old black-and-white films showing hundreds of men during the (here's that word) the Depression of the 1930's. Most of them are "slouched and slumped". If the writer of that sentence you give as example used the present-tensed "slouch and slump", he did that as a literary device, similar to this example in Spanish:
    "Come y come, Alejandro no paró de cenar hasta las onze de la noche."

    As far as being a compound, it may be in British English, though in the US it be might considered a done phrase, like "back and forth", "this and that", or "hurry up and wait". But compound may mean a fixed phrase in England rather and a word made up of two words as it does in the US.


    I hope this explains some things. I think you went to sleep. Did you?


    WOOOWWWW!!! Qué explicación!!!! No, I didn't go to sleep and won't go. I am supposed to wake up in 2 hours. So why bother going to bed now??? What time is in your place? You are not sleeping either. Your explanations are great and you are helping me a lot. THANKS! By the way, I was the writer of that sentence. Malachy is the protagonist of the novel "Angela's Ashes" by the Irish writer Frank McCourt. Excellent book! I love it!

    Art
     
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