Slovak: A váń listkov bozkáva ho

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murasz

Member
Ukrainian
Could anyone please help translate the two phrases marked in bold from the poem below?
1) A váń listkov bozkáva ho,
Je mu blízky,

2) Vej, vetríček: viej si lipu
uctiť Slavín
,


“Boleslavínovi Vrchovskému.”
Kto sa pod tou, pod košatou,
Lipou modlí,
Lipou modlí,
Lipou modlí?
A kto na ńu upiera svoj
Pohľad orlí,
Pohľad orlí,
Pohľad orlí?
Jeho pohľad plný túžby
Čerí lístky,
Čerí lístky,
Čerí lístky -
A váń listkov bozkáva ho,
Je mu blízky,

Je mu blízky,
Je mu blízky.
Vej, vetríček: viej si lipu
uctiť Slavín
,
uctiť Slavín,
uctiť Slavín:
ajhľa, veď tam kľačí brat náš
Boleslavín,
Boleslavín, Boleslavín.
 
  • Enquiring Mind

    Senior Member
    English - the Queen's
    The verse is a paean to Alexandr Boleslavín Vrchovský, a lawyer who worked in Pest, Hungary, and was active in seeking to encourage a sense of Slovak national identity among ethnic Slovaks in the early 19th century.
    I'm not 100% sure of the meaning because I can't find any useful references, this is my educated opinion. The letter ń doesn't exist in modern Slovak orthography, but I take váń to be a literary/poetic alternative of vôňa - "scent", "perfume", so:
    (i) "the scent of the leaves kisses him, he (the person praying under the lime/linden tree, who turns out to be Vrchovský) holds it close to his heart", and
    (ii) "Blow (o) wind, blow the linden/lime tree to honour Slavín."
    I can't see why two different forms (vej. viej) of the imperative (if, indeed, that's correct) are used. Again, maybe poetic/literary language. I can't think what else "viej si lipu" could mean here.

    I don't know when the verse was written. Slavín, a hill near Bratislava, has become one of the symbols of Slovak statehood.
     
    Last edited:

    murasz

    Member
    Ukrainian
    Many thanks for the explanation! That's what I needed. The poem is quoted in: Anna Procyk. Giuseppe Mazzini’s Young Europe and the Birth of Modern Nationalism in the Slavic World . It must have been written in the 1830s. I admit their may be spelling mistakes in the quotation.
     

    morior_invictus

    Senior Member
    Slovak
    a váń listkov bozkáva ho = (lit.) and a breeze of leaves is kissing him (here, to kiss = to touch lightly/gently)(EM used the present simple here so I assume, in poetry, one uses the present simple to create the sense of immediacy and not the present continuous)

    vej, vetríček: viej si lipu = blow (o) wind, blow the linden/lime tree (as EM mentioned above)(vetríček is an emotionally-charged diminutive form of vietor/wind and it's used here as a friendly/warmly affectionate/hearty etc. way of speaking to the wind; as for viej, it may be that the poet chose it because of the change in the grammatical sense or as an attempt to make vej sound more emotionally charged or to express that the wind/breeze was blowing the linden gently/playfully as in ovievaj (si) X or to differentiate between imperatives of vanúť/viať or because viej is how the Czech věj might have been rendered in certain dialects in 1836; or maybe he just wanted to sound cool/hip)

    vánok p. vietor 1
    vietor 1. prúdenie vzduchu horizontálnym smerom: ostrý, ľadový vietor; vietor sa obrátil • vetríkvánok • poet. van (veľmi mierny vietor)
    Source: slovnik.juls.savba.sk : vánok

    oviať oveje ovejú dok. viatím zasiahnuť, ovanúť: o-l ho vánok, chlad, pach;
    Source: slovnik.juls.savba.sk : oviať

    Here's a Czech transcription:
    Tužby plné oko jeho lístky hýbá,
    a větřík zas lístků hnutých jeho líbá.
    Věj, větříčku, na něj: lípu ctívá Slavín,
    a hle, klečí to tam bratr náš Boleslavín.
    Source: zahorskemuzeum.sk (Ľudovít Štúr : Boleslavinu Vrchovskému)

    lime noun
    (also lime tree); (US usually linden)
    a large tree with leaves shaped like a heart and pale yellow flowers
    Source: dictionary.cambridge.org
     
    Last edited:
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