Slovak: Case with weekdays

Masseman

New Member
Swedish
From what I've read, I thought the preposition v/vo always takes the locative case.

However, for the days of the week, it seems they are in the accusative: v pondelok, v utorok, v stredu, etc.

Is this a particularity for the days of the week, or does v/vo take the accusative in other situations as well?
 
  • bibax

    Senior Member
    Czech (Prague)
    Generally, the Slavic preposition v/vo/ve/vu/... (< *vъ(n), cognate with the preposition en/in, the initial consonant v is prosthetic) takes both accusative and locative, depending on context (similarly like the preposition in in German - accusative/dative, or in Latin - accusative/ablative).

    The Slovak preposition v/vo in full detail here.
     
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    Awwal12

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Is this a particularity for the days of the week, or does v/vo take the accusative in other situations as well?
    Slavic "v" with the accusative case means direction (goes where? > into something). Slavic "v" with the locative/prepositional case, on the other hand, means location (located where? > in something). However, for temporal coordinates Slavic languages often use expressions equal to the "directive" spatial ones (although they simply answer the question "when" in that case). Still I doubt there is some uniformity regarding different time units in any Slavic language. For instance, Russian uses different prepositions with different cases for weekdays (v + acc.), weeks (na + prep.), months (v + prep.) etc.
     
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    bibax

    Senior Member
    Czech (Prague)
    Note the difference in using cases in temporal expressions (Slovak):

    (1) v strede (loc.) týždňa = in the middle of the week;

    Horúčavy udrú v strede týždňa. (A heat wave will hit in the middle of the week.)

    However v stred (acc.) týždňa is also possible (probably somewhat archaic or bookish):
    Fašiangy sa svätili v stred týždňa.
    To sa jej stalo takým milým zvykom, že keď stihla, aj v stred týždňa sa modlila.

    (2) v stredu (acc.) = on Wednesday;

    Meteorológovia varujú pred horúčavami, ktoré v stredu zasiahnu časť západného, južného aj stredného Slovenska.

    N.B. stred (the middle) is masc., streda (Wednesday) is fem.
     
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    Masseman

    New Member
    Swedish
    Thanks, everyone! It's getting clearer. My level of Slovak is still too low to easily read Slovak-language sources, which is probably where most of the answers are to be found.

    So, if Slovak works like other Slavic languages, there should be uses with movement where v is used with the accusative? I noticed in Slovak Wiktionary that the usage for time is listed:

    2. (s akuzatívom) vyjadruje čas či miesto deja
    • v utorok, v diaľ
    I don't quite understand the place of action refers to. Does it imply movement?
     

    Panceltic

    Senior Member
    Slovenščina
    I believe that in West Slavic languages the "v + accusative" construction (to imply movement to a certain place) has generally been replaced by "do + genitive" construction; whilst to convey being in a location is still "v + locative".

    Compare "Bývam v Bratislave." vs. "Idem do Bratislavy." The second sentence would be something akin to "Idem v Bratislavu" in many other Slavic languages.

    When talking about time (like in e.g. "v pondelok"), the accusative construction has been preserved.
     
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