Slovak: Kto nemá chuti, ľahko sa vykrúti.

Tisztul_A_Visztula

Senior Member
Hungarian
I could not figure out the meaning of this proverb.

The second part of sentence is related to be dancing? Or to being twisted? I also found a special meaning of “vykrúčať sa” as the imperfect form of “vkrútiť sa”, which is to be beat around/about the bush.

My best bet is that Who has no hunger, he can easily dance (a lot / unto ‘death’). Is it the right interpretation?
 
  • numerator

    Senior Member
    Hungarian, Slovak
    Well, "chuť" doesn't need to mean "chuť do jedla" but generally an eagerness/willingness to do something.
    Nemám chuť to robiť. = Nechce sa mi to robiť. (HUN: nincs hozzá kedvem, nem akaródzik)

    And yes, "vykrúcať sa" can mean "doing twists and turns while dancing, but "beating around the bush, wriggling your way out of an obligation" is also a very common meaning, and that's the one that fits here.
     

    Tisztul_A_Visztula

    Senior Member
    Hungarian
    Well, "chuť" doesn't need to mean "chuť do jedla" but generally an eagerness/willingness to do something.
    Nemám chuť to robiť. = Nechce sa mi to robiť. (HUN: nincs hozzá kedvem, nem akaródzik)

    And yes, "vykrúcať sa" can mean "doing twists and turns while dancing, but "beating around the bush, wriggling your way out of an obligation" is also a very common meaning, and that's the one that fits here.
    Thanks. I checked what you added and now my favourite expression with chuť is “chuť do života”.

    And I am now wondering about and imagining also that in the same way as at the start of any collective (I mean shared) eatings the godspeed “Dobrú chuť!” is mutually said by the participants, the godspeed “Dobrú chuť do života!” should be said to each newborn by the doctors and nurses at the very moment of birth.

    Again, absurd, but this time not humour, just approach.

    EDIT: in Hungarian it is also said in case of unwillingness that “Nincs hozzá gusztusom.”, which is practically equal to “…. étvágyam.”
     
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