Slovak: pästiarstiev

Concise

Senior Member
Hungarian
Since I am an autodidact learner it was not so easy to figure out when exactly we use the different forms in plural genitive of masculine and neuter nouns.

The easisest rule seems to be that if there is a long vowel (or a sort of diphtong) in the penultimate syllable of the noun like in case of “skôlka” I use a suffix with short vowel like “-ok”, so “skôlok”.

And when there is a short vowel in the penultimate syllable like in case of “kabelka” I use a suffix with a diphtong, commonly “ie”, so “kabeliek”.

“Pästiarstiev” seems to be an exemption at first glance unless in Slovak “ia” does not count neither a long vowel (evidently it is not), nor a diphtong. If it is not a diphtong, then one has to pronounce separately “i” and “a” for a normal time, so not like in case of “ie”.

Am I correct and “ia” is not a dipthong? Or am I wrong, because “ia” is a diphtong, too, and “pästierstiev” is just another damned exemption from the general rule? :)

Thanks a lot again.

Hint: in the meantime I had an idea and checked whether there is another noun with the same beginning and found “pästiarka” which Pl. G. is “pästiarok”. Bang!

Anyway if there is some other explanation like the words ending with “-stvo” are different, because the jam of the consonants breaks the rule previously described, or something like that, then I would be glad to learn it and understand how the Slovak think when they form their own language.
 
  • vianie

    Senior Member
    Slovak
    Am I correct and “ia” is not a dipthong? Or am I wrong, because “ia” is a diphtong, too, and “pästierstiev” is just another damned exemption from the general rule? :)
    Yes, you're right, you're wrong again. :)

    However, this case shouldn't be the subject of the syllable shortening rule. We can find quite a lot of examples of two successive diphthongs in a word in Slovak. For example, verbs containing -ie- on penultimate syllable get -ia ending in 3rd person pl (bielia, cielia, hniezdia, hviezdia, kliesnia, kriesia, liečia, mienia, mieria, miesia, riešia, vsietia...). There's much more to be demonstrated but I'm not a trained linguist and I'm still struggling with English. Hopefully, more to come later.
     
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    Concise

    Senior Member
    Hungarian
    Thanks, and I saw that you modified “tomorrow” to “later”. ;-).

    Nevertheless I would be more relaxed that if either you or somebody else had listed Pl. G. form of some nouns (!) with the same logics as in the example I found.
     
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