Slovak: plynutie času a lehoty v práve

Rory74

New Member
English
Hi everyone,

I need some help please translating the title of a law paper "plynutie času a lehoty v práve".

The subject of the paper is how time works in law (how lawyers count time limits) and about time limits in law.

Here is my translation attempt, which I'm sure can be improved upon: "Time and time limits in Law".

Vopred dakujem,

Rory
 
  • Enquiring Mind

    Senior Member
    English - the Queen's
    Hi Rory74, and welcome to the forums :). Your translation is idiomatic and fine as it stands. Pedants purists might argue that "plynutie" ("passage") isn't accounted for, but translation isn't about reproducing words, it's about meaning.
     

    Rory74

    New Member
    English
    Thanks for your reply, Enquiring Mind.

    In the end I went for "The passage of time and time limits in Law"
     

    morior_invictus

    Senior Member
    Slovak
    I think that "the passage of time" would, indeed, be the most accurate translation since "plynutie času" is used here as a specific legal concept and lawyers (who are also likely to be "purists," as EM put it) tend to get overemotional when proper (or customary) terms are not used. As far as the Slovak law is concerned, time can be viewed (and finds its way into Slovak legal norms) as:
    • a date – with a certain date a certain legal relationship might be created/modified/destructed (e.g. January 20th – the date of divorce - the end of the legal relationship that was created when the two people concerned got married)
    ---------- X (January 20th) ----------
    • a period (the passage of time) – when a certain period of time passes, a certain legal relationship might be created/modified/destructed (e.g. 10 years – a statutory period over which a title to an immovable thing may be acquired by open and continuous possession* – usucapio / acquisitive prescription)
    X <----------- 10 years ------------> Y



    __________________
    * well, it's not just the continuous possession that would matter; there are other things as iustus titulus, bona fide, etc.
     
    Last edited:

    Rory74

    New Member
    English
    I think that "the passage of time" would, indeed, be the most accurate translation since "plynutie času" is used here as a specific legal concept and lawyers (who are also likely to be "purists," as EM put it) tend to get overemotional when proper (or customary) terms are not used. As far as the Slovak law is concerned, time can be viewed (and finds its way into Slovak legal norms) as:
    • a date – with a certain date a certain legal relationship might be created/modified/destructed (e.g. January 20th – the date of divorce - the end of the legal relationship that was created when the two people concerned got married)
    ---------- X (January 20th) ----------
    • a period (the passage of time) – when a certain period of time passes, a certain legal relationship might be created/modified/destructed (e.g. 10 years – a statutory period over which a title to an immovable thing may be acquired by open and continuous possession* – usucapio / acquisitive prescription)
    X <----------- 10 years ------------> Y



    __________________
    * well, it's not just the continuous possession that would matter; there are other things as iustus titulus, bona fide, etc.


    Dakujem morior_invictus :thumbsup:
     
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