Slovak: Poď von

Oleg68

Senior Member
Russian
What does mean Poď von?
Get out?

Do všetkých lavíc píšeš tak ako básnik,
Že si sa do mňa práve trochu zbláznil
Do schránky nápad tajne dáš
Poď von!
(Darina Rolincova, Čo o mne vieš?)
 
  • morior_invictus

    Senior Member
    Slovak
    Back when there were no cell phones, kids/teenagers in Bratislava used to walk over to their friend's place (almost always located in a prefabricated socialist-era apartment building) and either call them through their building's intercom system or wait for the right moment and yell their name so that their friend would ultimately lean out of the window and engage in a more personal (but less private/considerate) conversation with them. The purpose of this was mostly to convince their friend to take part in social life outside their home. Once the initial contact was established, the phrase that followed was almost always "Poď von!" ["Come out! (and let's do something/let's go somewhere etc.)"].

    In case of Dara's song, "Poď von!" has romantic connotations and it is understood that the boy who is in love with her want her to go out with him to spend time together, to "hang out". . .
     
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    Oleg68

    Senior Member
    Russian
    First, I thought it means пошёл вон! in Russian. I see. Poď von = spend time together.
    Thank you very much!
     

    morior_invictus

    Senior Member
    Slovak
    . . .or if you want to keep the syntax close to the original:

    Poď von! = Go out (with me)! (so I can get to know you better, maybe tell you how I feel about you if you're lucky and I manage to overcome my shyness etc.)(he is, more or less, asking her out on a date but it's pretty much only implied in this case; he simply wants to hang out with her somewhere outdoors - maybe sit on a bench and talk, go for a walk in a park. . .)
     

    numerator

    Senior Member
    Hungarian, Slovak
    I agree that all these beautiful connotations are there in the song but, by itself, the phrase just means "come outside".
    It could also be completely neutral - or even threatening, in a different situation.
     
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