Slovak: 'Tejto' vs 'Tento/Táto/Toto'

lafz_puchnevala

Senior Member
Tamil
Hey guys, I am not sure what is the difference between the above 2 words and their usage when they are used to say 'This <noun> ...'
For Eg. This photograph is... Would it be Tento fotografii... or Tejto fotografii...? I am assuming the noun 'fotografii' is masculine, if it's feminine, it will be 'Táto fotografii'?
Cheers
 
  • ZDalexx

    Member
    Slovak
    Hello,
    Tento (masculine) /táto (feminine) /toto (neuter) are demonstrative pronouns which are declined according the noun they are describing.

    This photograph = Tento fotograf - masculine animate singular in nominative.
    This photography/picture = Táto fotografia - feminine singular in nominative.

    tejto fotografii - is dative singular, so it cannot mean "This photography/picture"

    If you want to use "This is..." you use the nominative singular, so you use tento for masculine nouns, táto for feminine and toto for neuter nouns.
    Tejto fotografii or Týchto fotografií (genitive plural) is correct ("fotografia" is feminine) but you don't use it after This is...

    (I'm not sure if I can post a link, but you can easily find on Google its declination / skloňovanie)

    Edit : Skloňovanie táto
     
    Last edited:

    lafz_puchnevala

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    So 'tejto' can be used for plural forms of the nouns, eg. These photographs are..., similar to 'tieto'? Also why is 'tejto' used in for example 'Čo je na tejto fotografii?' Would it be fine to use 'tento' here instead?
     

    ZDalexx

    Member
    Slovak
    "What is (showed) on this photography?" In this case na tejto fotografii is locative singular used (locative is always used with a preposition, sometimes you can find that this case is called "prepositional case").
    Tieto fotografie is nominative plural and you can use it after "There are".
    If you are speaking about a photo / picture you use fotografia which is a feminine noun, so you can't use tento because it's reserved for masculine nouns.

    My first message was maybe confusing for you because I've thought that you were speaking about "the man who takes the photos" - fotograf which is masculine noun, but fotografia (picture / photo) is feminine noun. I apologize if it was confusing for you.
     

    lafz_puchnevala

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    I am still not sure how the locative case works because I don't think its present in english. So, 'tejto' is used here instead of 'táto fotografia' because we are talking about a location here ie. 'on this phototograph?
    Maybe be a bit advanced for me as I am still at A1 slovak.
     

    ZDalexx

    Member
    Slovak
    No it's not present in English. Slovak is highly inflected language. You describe the relationship between the subject, the verb and other components of the sentence by fixed word order in English, but in Slovak you describe this relationship by using the declension (= way of modifying the nouns), that's why the Slovak word order is less strict.
    Yes, you're right here. You can use locative case here because you are speaking about a kind of location on the photo.
    We use the locative case mostly to denote a location, the locative case can be used also with certain prepositions with meaning other than location, but can never be used without preposition (that's why sometimes you can find that it's called "prepositional case"). Sometimes location can be described by using another case, but it's mostly by using the locative case.

    I understand that if you are not familiar with case system / declensions, that can be "struggling" for you.
    At the beginning, if you are speaking about direct object, you should use the accusative case, for un indirect object the dative case, for location locative case, to tell "with someone / something" you use the instrumental case and for possession genitive case. Of course there are some exceptions, but this is very simplified way to explain it and maybe that can give you some idea. You need to learn in which situation which case should be used.
     
    Top