Slovak: why perfective verbs are grouped as “k 1” and “k 2”

Concise

Senior Member
Hungarian
If you check this link

Slovenské slovníky

you can see that while the dictionary
Slovník súčasného slovenského jazyka A – G, H – L, M – N
z r. 2006, 2011, 2015.”

lists naliať as the perfective pair of liať,

Slovník slovenského jazyka
z r. 1959 – 1968*.”

lists vyliať, uliať and odliať.

Moreover the last three are listed as “dok. k 1 vyliať, k 2 uliať, odliať”

I checked the úvod of the dictionary, but I found no explanation for the letter k as an abbreviation/code. Even if I understood what k means I am sure I would not understand why are these three perfective verbs are grouped in this way?

I know it may sound a strange request, but can someone please lend me a helping hand?
 
  • numerator

    Senior Member
    Hungarian, Slovak
    I suppose "k" here is simply the preposition k, corresponding to the English preposition to.
    The dictionary lists several distinct meanings listed for liať, numbered 1, 2, 3 and 4.

    And the perfective form corresponding to meaning 1 (pour a liquid) is vyliať; *
    and the form corresponding to meaning 2 (cast a metal object by pouring liquid metal in to a form) is uliať or odliať.

    *At least so the dictionary says, but I would take issue with listing vyliať as simply a perfective form with no extra meaning. It really only has the meaning pour out, so if we were talking about pouring liquid into a vessel, the proper perfective form would, of course, be vliať, if pouring from one vessel to another, preliať, if distributing the liquid into several vessels, rozliať; etc. etc.
     
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    numerator

    Senior Member
    Hungarian, Slovak
    EDIT: and if we are talking about pouring a glass, the proper perfective is naliať, just as the other dictionary says.

    This is in fact a very frequent situation that none of the prefixed verbs is simply "perfective", without adding some extra meaning.
     

    Concise

    Senior Member
    Hungarian
    I suppose "k" here is simply the preposition k, corresponding to the English preposition to.
    The dictionary lists several distinct meanings listed for liať, numbered 1, 2, 3 and 4.

    And the perfective form corresponding to meaning 1 (pour a liquid) is vyliať; *
    and the form corresponding to meaning 2 (cast a metal object by pouring liquid metal in to a form) is uliať or odliať.

    *At least so the dictionary says, but I would take issue with listing vyliať as simply a perfective form with no extra meaning. It really only has the meaning pour out, so if we were talking about pouring liquid into a vessel, the proper perfective form would, of course, be vliať, if pouring from one vessel to another, preliať, if distributing the liquid into several vessels, rozliať; etc. etc.
    All the answers related to perfective/imperfective, received from you, francisgranada, Sobakus and vianie made me think.

    I made an important decision. Following my former decision if I meet a new Slovak verb, either imperfective or perfective, I will still check whether it exists in another form, but from now I will check ONLY whether an un-prefixed verb has another un-prefixed form with the other aspect.

    Like dat' and dávat', or umyt' and umy'vat' (maybe umyt' is also prefixed, but now it is not so important, so I did not check it), strihat' and strihnút', hovorit' and povedat' (I checked earlier and think that povedat' is not po+vedat').

    And if I meet a prefixed verb before I meet it in its unprefixed form, I will do the same, but will stick to the same prefix.

    It makes no sense to hunt for a "secondary" perfective for a primary imperfective and vice versa, or for a real secondary imperfective just to put it next to a "primary" perfective.

    And thus I will be not confused with the verbs, as am I now.
     
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