Slovak: words different from Czech, Polish and Ukrainian

ilocas2

Banned
Czech
This thread is inspired by thread Croatian: words different both from Serbian and Slovene

SK / CZ / PL / UA / EN

ťava / velbloud / wielbłąd / верблюд / camel

cencúľ / rampouch / sopel / бурулька / icicle
 
  • Azori

    Senior Member
    SK: vravieť = to tell, to talk, to narrate (synonymous with the verb hovoriť)

    CZ: říkat, povídat, mluvit PL: mówić UA: розповідати

    Czech has only a (literary) noun - vřava = uproar, turmoil, tumult (/mix of various sounds), in Slovak vrava = conversation, talk; way of speaking

    Polish: wrzawa = 1. mix of voices / screams / sounds... 2. commotion, tumult
     
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    vianie

    Senior Member
    Slovak
    Yep, and within a bikers community we also say bajk or cajgel.
     
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    Encolpius

    Senior Member
    Hungarian
    It would be more fantastic to list only completely different words [different etymology] here (míč, м'яч ;)).. Right now I am studying some Ukrainian and it is difficult to find a completely new common word for me. I'll think harder. So far maybe: майже. :confused:
     

    Encolpius

    Senior Member
    Hungarian
    Why not to make it harder? :) Like these examples:
    CZ: krajka
    SK: čipka
    PL: koronka
    UA: мере́живо
    RU: кру́жево
     

    vianie

    Senior Member
    Slovak
    I thought the idea is that the Slovak word should be completely different from the other three.
    I think that at least some of these Slovak words taken from Hungarian meet this requirement: chýr, írečitý, beťár, bosorka, budzogáň, frmol, somár, gamby, curigať, biršagovať, igen, perkelt, chotár, oldomáš, juhás, husár, šarkan, bajúzy, kantár, dínom-dánom, jarok, sihoť, banovať, bantovať, cifrovať, árendáš, čatloš, lojtra.

    However, it should be noted that due to the specific development of the Slovak language, only quite a few Slovak terms calqued from Hungarian got from dialects into modern or literary Slovak.
     

    AndrasBP

    Senior Member
    Hungarian
    I think that at least some of these Slovak words taken from Hungarian meet this requirement: chýr, írečitý, beťár, bosorka, budzogáň, frmol, somár, gamby, curigať, biršagovať, igen, perkelt, chotár, oldomáš, juhás, husár, šarkan, bajúzy, kantár, dínom-dánom, jarok, sihoť, banovať, bantovať, cifrovať, árendáš, čatloš, lojtra.
    Very interesting list, thank you. :)
    I don't speak any Slovak, but I guess most of these words are now archaic or dialectal, right?

    There are a few words that I can't identify. :)
    What do the following mean?
    írečitý, gamby, curigať, sihoť
     

    Panceltic

    Senior Member
    Slovenščina
    I think that at least some of these Slovak words taken from Hungarian meet this requirement: chýr, írečitý, beťár, bosorka, budzogáň, frmol, somár, gamby, curigať, biršagovať, igen, perkelt, chotár, oldomáš, juhás, husár, šarkan, bajúzy, kantár, dínom-dánom, jarok, sihoť, banovať, bantovať, cifrovať, árendáš, čatloš, lojtra.

    However, it should be noted that due to the specific development of the Slovak language, only quite a few Slovak terms calqued from Hungarian got from dialects into modern or literary Slovak.

    Is lojtra really Hungarian? We use the same word colloquialy in Slovenian (standard word is lestev) and it comes from German as far as I know.

    Assuming it means ladder of course, maybe it’s a false friend :)
     

    Encolpius

    Senior Member
    Hungarian
    ankle
    really different in all Slavic languages


    Czech: kotník
    Slovak: členok
    Polish: kostka
    Ukranian: щи́колотка
    Russian: лодыжка
    Bulgarian: глезен
    Upper Sorbian: kulka

    It would be interesting to find similar words in other language groups, I mean, totally different words in Romance languages, right?
     

    Encolpius

    Senior Member
    Hungarian
    Oops, let's consult the Russian forum. :) Czechs have also two words, hlezno, mostly used in medicine. I think the situation might be similar in Russian, don't you think so?
     

    Tisztul_A_Visztula

    Senior Member
    Hungarian
    Yep, and within a bikers community we also say bajk or cajgel.
    When I was a young kid we said “cajga” to refer to our “bicycle” and said “cajgázni” to refer to the verb “to bicycle”. At that time I had not the slightest idea that we, Hungarian biker kids also used some words in our jargon which had a very similar form among the Slovak bikers kids/community. :)
     

    Tisztul_A_Visztula

    Senior Member
    Hungarian
    Is lojtra really Hungarian? We use the same word colloquialy in Slovenian (standard word is lestev) and it comes from German as far as I know.
    “Yes, it comes from German, both in Hungarian (létra) and in Slovak/Slovene.”

    Let me add that also in Hungarian there is a form lajtorja, which is archaic/rustic and nowadays a bit of funny form of “létra”
     

    Tisztul_A_Visztula

    Senior Member
    Hungarian
    Yes, as you wrote it, now I remember that in Győr both forms existed. With j and with n.

    EDIT: in the meantime it also came to my mind that the changes of the form must have been that in Hungarian bicikli => bicaj => cajga => canga.

    My question is whether in Slovak is there any forms close to “bicaj”, similarly as the Slovak “cajgel” is close to the Hungarian “cajga”?
     

    vianie

    Senior Member
    Slovak
    My question is whether in Slovak is there any forms close to “bicaj”, similarly as the Slovak “cajgel” is close to the Hungarian “cajga”?
    Most probably no. I would rather think "cajgel" comes from English "sajkl" through the slovakisation process.

    You might find it interesting we commonly pronounce (at least we in the West) "mám bicygel" or "dva bicygle".
     

    jasio

    Senior Member
    I think that at least some of these Slovak words taken from Hungarian meet this requirement: chýr, írečitý, beťár, bosorka, budzogáň, frmol, somár, gamby, curigať, biršagovať, igen, perkelt, chotár, oldomáš, juhás, husár, šarkan, bajúzy, kantár, dínom-dánom, jarok, sihoť, banovať, bantovať, cifrovať, árendáš, čatloš, lojtra.
    Some of these words - or their cognates - are known in Polish or in dialects. Baciar, buzdygan, juhas, husarz (albo huzar), kantar, arendarz...
     

    Encolpius

    Senior Member
    Hungarian
    CZ: námluvy
    SK: pytačky
    PL: konkury, zaloty
    UR: залиця́ння
    RU: сва́танье

    I have know idea what it is in English. I think it does not exist, only here in Central-Eastern Eruope.


     

    Tisztul_A_Visztula

    Senior Member
    Hungarian
    CZ: námluvy
    SK: pytačky
    PL: konkury, zaloty
    UR: залиця́ння
    RU: сва́танье

    I have know idea what it is in English. I think it does not exist, only here in Central-Eastern Eruope.


    I guess you mean “proposal” when a boy/man asks a girl/woman for marriage.

    As I know it is also called “proposal” when you dont ask her herself, but her father/parents (whether just father or both depends on the local culture) for their permission.
     

    Tisztul_A_Visztula

    Senior Member
    Hungarian
    I checked the definition of pytačka, and it seem to be “making a proposal, and that of námluvy, but it seems to be “courting/wooing”.

    Are you sure that they are the closest Slovak and Czech words, respectively, to each other as regards their meaning?
     

    numerator

    Senior Member
    Hungarian, Slovak
    I agree that Slovak "pytačky" - asking the girl's parents for her hand in marriage - would normally come after a period of "dvorenie" - courting, wooing.

    I was surprised to see that, by the dictionary definition, Czech "námluvy" seems to refer to both:
    Slovník spisovného jazyka českého

    Is this correct? Does this reflect a period when marriages were arranged by the parents to the extent that there was no actual courtship between the young folks? I'm genuinely confused now.

    @Cautus ? @Mori.cze ? @Enquiring Mind ? please help :eek:
     
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