Smooth (pronunciation)

< Previous | Next >
  • JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    If you looked in the one behind he search box here at WRF, you would find.
    smooth /smuːð/
    That indicates a voiced th as in the word the. Neither voiceless th nor d sound right to me.
     

    mplsray

    Senior Member
    The Merriam-Webster dictionary at www.m-w.com uses \th\ (using the underscore) to represent the sound which in the International Phonetic Alphabet is represented by /ð/ (the symbol which JulianStuart mentioned) . It represents the IPA /θ/ (as in thimble) by \th\. It shows the correct pronunciation of smooth when it represents it as \ˈsmüth\.
     
    Last edited:

    Daniel López

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    The Merriam-Webster dictionary at www.m-w.com uses \th\ (using the underscore) to represent the sound which in the International Phonetic Alphabet is represented by /ð/ (the symbol which JulianStuart mentioned) . It represents the IPA /θ/ (as in thimble) by \th\. It shows the correct pronunciation of smooth when it represents it as \ˈsmüth\.

    I hearthe promunciation in MerriamWebster once and again and it sounds clearly /smu:θ/ to me. A voiceless,interdental, fricative sound. As in "both"
    So, my doubt remains.

    Maybe the following sound modifies it. e.g.

    "A smooth operator"(smooth-voiced sound= /smu:ð/)
    "A smooth table" (smooth-voiceless sound= /smu:θ/)

     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    I hearthe promunciation in MerriamWebster once and again and it sounds clearly /smu:θ/ to me. A voiceless,interdental, fricative sound. As in "both"
    So, my doubt remains.

    Maybe the following sound modifies it. e.g.

    "A smooth operator"(smooth-voiced sound= /smu:ð/)
    "A smooth table" (smooth-voiceless sound= /smu:θ/)
    I just listened to the MW audio and hear the voicing - it's not exaggerated but it's there. Compare the audio of smooth with tooth in the MW site. The following word may emphasize the voicing but it can't (shouldn't) eliminate it.
     

    Biffo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I hearthe promunciation in MerriamWebster once and again and it sounds clearly /smu:θ/ to me. A voiceless,interdental, fricative sound. As in "both"
    So, my doubt remains.

    Maybe the following sound modifies it. e.g.

    "A smooth operator"(smooth-voiced sound= /smu:ð/)
    "A smooth table" (smooth-voiceless sound= /smu:θ/)
    I tried listening to the link Daniel. I hear it very clearly as voiced! :) The same is true for both American and British pronunciations in the Wordreference dictionary. I don't believe there is much difference in your final two examples except that the latter "th" is shorter.

    (cross-posted with Julian Stuart)
     

    Euphoria.

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    There are two "th" sounds in English, voiced, /ð/, and unvoiced, /θ/. Only the voiced pronunciation is acceptable in smooth.

    (I think the original poster used the symbol /d/ when he should have used /ð/.)
    I meant the unvoiced one. That's bad if I have to pronounce it with the voiced "th". That means I have work on the pronunciation and remember it is not the unvoiced th when speaking. Thank you.
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    If you use the voiceless version, you will be understood, but you will sound 'foreign'.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top