Snack Vs Peck at?

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sambistapt

Senior Member
Brazilian Portuguese
Hello amigos!

I don´t eat so much at the parties, I´d prefer to snack/peck at the nuggets instead.

Do they mean the same in this sample?

Thanks,

Sam:cool:
 
  • Cathy Rose

    Senior Member
    United States English
    I would say, "I'd prefer to snack on the nuggets." Also, I don't think I'd use "peck" because it is a word we use for birds. I'd probably say "pick at the nuggets."
     

    Cathy Rose

    Senior Member
    United States English
    In AE, I most often hear "pick." A person who dislikes many foods is called a "picky eater." Children are often described this way. If I'm not really hungry, I just "pick" at my food. I have never heard "peck" used this way in my part of the country, but others may have a different experience.
     

    anothersmith

    Senior Member
    English, U.S.
    In British English, they sometimes say "I'm feeling peckish" to mean "I'm feeling a bit hungry." But the verb "to peck" is used only with reference to birds.
     

    Eigenfunction

    Senior Member
    England - English
    I have heard the word peck at used to describe someone who isn't hungry or doesn't want to eat, so they peck at their food, poking it with knife and fork, maybe eating small bits but generally not eating all of it and not very fast at that.
     

    Cathy Rose

    Senior Member
    United States English
    After saying that I had never heard the word used that way, I heard something like it today. I was watching a cooking show (Rachel Ray) and she said,
    "I had some extra nuts, but I was feeling peckish during the break, and I ate them." That's the first time I'd heard a form of the word, so I thought I'd get on and reverse my original posting. :)
     

    bibliolept

    Senior Member
    AE, Español
    After saying that I had never heard the word used that way, I heard something like it today. I was watching a cooking show (Rachel Ray) and she said,
    "I had some extra nuts, but I was feeling peckish during the break, and I ate them." That's the first time I'd heard a form of the word, so I thought I'd get on and reverse my original posting. :)
    "Peckish" is very much BE as far as I know.
     

    Moglet

    Senior Member
    UK
    British/Hiberno-English
    "Peckish" is very much BE as far as I know.
    Hi all, new forum member here!

    I'm assuming that "BE" stands for 'British English', in which case "feeling a bit peckish" is used to indicate that one has a slight appetite but is not hugely hungry.

    Regarding "pick vs. peck", I'd say it's more common to describe someone as "picking at their food." The term is commonly used when someone appears to have no appetite and therefore eats very little of the meal in front of them (frequently during times of emotional upset).
     
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