snooty, smug and sniffy

Voxy

Senior Member
Deutschland, deutsch
Hello folks,

this time something completely different. ;)

There are a few words in the wild, that describe people
with a certain attitude. ;) I know smug for a while, I learned
snooty today and I looked up sniffy few minutes ago.
Can you rate these terms or put them into a certain order
from very formal to slang? That would be nice.

Voxy
 
  • AWordLover

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Hi,

    I would consider smug to be a perfectly formal, well understood, word.
    I think snooty sounds a bit more like slang, but would be well understood.
    I will look up the word sniffy to learn it's meaning. I guess it is not well known.
     

    Voxy

    Senior Member
    Deutschland, deutsch
    Hi,

    I would consider smug to be a perfectly formal, well understood, word.
    I think snooty sounds a bit more like slang, but would be well understood.
    I will look up the word sniffy to learn it's meaning. I guess it is not well known.
    This is close to my understanding, too. "Sniffy" I never heard before,
    so I can't tell you either.

    Thanks for your efford.

    Voxy
     

    Suehil

    Medemod
    British English
    Please note that 'snooty' and 'smug' don't mean the same thing. 'Snooty' means 'snobbish' and 'smug' means 'self-satisfied'
    I don't know 'sniffy', either, but I imagine it means much the same as 'snooty'.
     

    Ecossaise

    Senior Member
    English
    "Sniffy" as in "Don't be so sniffy about that pasta. It took me hours to cook" has the meaning "Don't be so contemptuous/disdainful of my cooking".
     

    Voxy

    Senior Member
    Deutschland, deutsch
    "Sniffy" as in "Don't be so sniffy about that pasta. It took me hours to cook" has the meaning "Don't be so contemptuous/disdainful of my cooking".
    How'd you consider the tone of that particular word?
    Friendly, with soft sarcasm underlying? Offensive,
    aggressive?

    E.g does snooty and sniffy in your example capture the same
    meaning, or else are there differences in attitude?

    Thanks.

    Voxy
     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    Ecossaise

    Senior Member
    English
    I haven't heard "snooty" used for a very long time! To me it carries more connotation of someone feeling/thinking themselves superior.

    "Sniffy" is gentler than you have suggested. It would probably be said with a tone of injury in the voice.
     

    Nunty

    Modified
    Hebrew-US English (bilingual)
    I am reviving this old thread because I have a problem with a job candidate evaluation that I am writing up. In my notes I wrote that she was "kind of snooty", "superior attitude".

    I'm trying to find a polite yet accurate way of saying this in my evaluation. Any ideas?

    Thanks!

    EDIT: I should add by way of context :)o) that is just for the file, documentation in case someone sues us for not hiring them and accuses us of some kind of discrimination.
     
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    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    I have no experience with this end of things, so I don't know the kind of language that is used.

    However, I once worked for what was then referred to as the State Employment Service. We would describe this sort of thing with phrases like "does not take supervision well", "does not seem to get along with co-workers." Perhaps this could be adapted to some neutral (?) statement that you felt that she would not fit in with / be comfortable with the collegial atmosphere of your office.
     
    Last edited:
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