snow is the most frequent in the heating season

hhtt

Senior Member
Turkish
"Snow, of course, is most frequent during the heating season. "

Hi, above sentence is from the book "Alternative energy demystified by Stan Gibilisco." But something seems me missing. I think, instead "most frequent" it should have been "most frequently seen" i.e "Snow, of course, is most frequently seen during the heating season. What is happening frequently is ambiguous.


Link to source: I cannot find a link to this source but here is a similar one.http://www.dailyinfo.co.uk/oxford/guide/climate

Thank you.
 
  • stez

    Senior Member
    english - australia
    I see nothing particularly wrong with the original sentence.
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    Snow happens whether you see it or not. It is not hiding (out of sight) at other times which is what "frequently seen" implies.
    Snow is most frequent during the coldest season and less frequent during the warmer seasons.
     

    bicontinental

    Senior Member
    English (US), Danish, bilingual
    Does "frequent" refer to "frequent precipitation type" ?

    Thank you.
    Grammatically speaking the original sentence uses a linking verb, is, with a predicate adjective (frequent)
    …”snow is (most) frequent”, where frequent modifies snow.
    Your suggested change uses an adverbial construction, …”is most frequently seen
    Bic.
     

    hhtt

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    Grammatically speaking the original sentence uses a linking verb, is, with a predicate adjective (frequent)
    …”snow is (most) frequent”, where frequent modifies snow.
    Your suggested change uses an adverbial construction, …”is most frequently seen
    Bic.

    Would you like to explain how frequent modifies it and is there any differences from the perspective of meaning if we do those changes?

    Thanks.
     

    bicontinental

    Senior Member
    English (US), Danish, bilingual
    Would you like to explain how frequent modifies it and is there any differences from the perspective of meaning if we do those changes?

    Thanks.

    Frequent modifies snow through a linking verb. This is the definition of a linking verb in Merriam Webster.
    a verb (such as appear, be, become, feel, grow, or seem ) that connects a subject with an adjective or noun that describes or identifies the subject
    On line you’ll find complete lists of linking verbs.

    A modifier or qualifier is a word (in your example the adjective ‘frequent’) that describes another in greater detail or makes it more specific, in your example the subject of the sentence, ‘snow’, i.e. the snow itself is what is frequent.
    More examples of modifiers can be found on this web site:
    http://www.grammar-monster.com/glossary/modifiers_modify.htm

    For the difference in meaning, please refer to Myridon’s post above (# 4)
    Bic.

    I thought of another example,
    My friend is wearing a new dress she made herself. It’s obvious it has taken her a long time to make it, the skirt has numerous, fine pleats, the top is embroidered in colorful patterns with perfect, uniform stitches… her work is impeccable. I might say to her,
    Your dress is beautiful!” Here, beautiful modifies the subject of the sentence, ‘your dress’… the dress itself is beautiful.
    Or I might say,
    Your dress is beautifully made!” Here the adverb beautifully modifies the verb (is) made, the focus is on the way the dress was made rather than the appearance of the dress itself.
    In most cases there probably won’t be much of a semantic difference between the two, but I f I didn’t find the dress beautiful but still appreciated the work behind it, I might go for the second option.
    Bic.
     
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