snuggle up "to / against"

TokyoSkyTree

Banned
Japanese
The child snuggled up to her mother. (From OALD)

The puppy snuggled up against the sleeping boy. (From Merriam-Webster)

I think that "snuggle up to" and "snuggle up against" mean the same thing, but what do you think?
 
  • splurge

    Senior Member
    Español
    How about "snuggle up with"? is that possible? or "with" is better used with "cuddle up to"?

    Regards.
     

    Juhasz

    Senior Member
    English - United States
    I probably wouldn't snuggle up with someone, but I would snuggle up with a good book.
     

    perpend

    Banned
    American English
    That is funny, but I guess the point is as benny says that "to snuggle up with someone" is also possible within the realm of snuggling.

    Essentially, you are getting quite cozy with a book when you snuggle up with one. ;)
     
    By the way, I think "snuggle up to" might have a slight nuance of motion by the snuggler (little movements of getting more and more comfortable/closer) whereas up"snuggle against" focuses more on the object in question, person, blanket, teddy bear, etc. Still, the meanings are basically the same.
     

    MedaBeda

    Senior Member
    Czech
    Is there any difference between snuggle and snuggle up?

    When I just want to get in bed to read a book and I want to be wrapped in a cover to feel cozy, could I say:

    I snuggled in bed.
    I snuggled up in bed.
    I was snuggled in bed.
    I was snuggled up in bed.

    snuggle and snuggle up have the same meaning in these sentences?
     
    Is there any difference between snuggle and snuggle up?

    When I just want to get in bed to read a book and I want to be wrapped in a cover to feel cozy, could I say:

    a I snuggled in bed.
    b I snuggled up in bed.
    c I was snuggled in bed.
    d I was snuggled up in bed.

    snuggle and snuggle up have the same meaning in these sentences?
    Same meaning. However your second, b, might be less common. Usually there is an object. I snuggled up to my dog in bed.

    Your third one c, causes me to picture a child saying, "I was snuggled in bed by my mom." It's a slightly different meaning (mom did not necessarily lie down or hug, but just wrapped the kid up).
     

    MedaBeda

    Senior Member
    Czech
    So when we have "up" after snuggle, it means that there is something / someone that we are snuggled up to.
    With no "to", it´s just like: I am/was snuggled in bed, snuggled in an armchair, snuggled on the floor, snuggled on a chair,... right?
     

    MedaBeda

    Senior Member
    Czech
    could it be that when people say "to be snuggled up" and there is no object, that they tend to use passive? /I am just thinking about my second sentence about which you wrote that it is less common vs. your last sentence which is simmilar, but in passive/
     

    Chasint

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Yes, the active/passive distinction shows up in patterns of usage, here.

    There are threads that VERY briefly discuss 'snuggle' issues.
    I don't see this as passive. Who or what is the agent? "I was snuggled up by [whom?]"

    Surely, "I was snuggled up in bed" is similar to "I was cosy in bed".
     

    MedaBeda

    Senior Member
    Czech
    ok sorry - snuggled and snuggled up are adjectives - not verbs.

    So, trying to make some "rule" how to know when I can say "snuggled" and when I can say "snuggled up", when I use "to be" like in these sentences:

    I was snuggled in bed.:tick:
    I was snuggled up in bed.:tick:

    -- snuggle and snuggle up have simmilar meaning in the previous sentences.


    But when we dont use "to be", it is better to use only snuggled and no "to" right?

    I snuggled in bed.:tick:
    I snuggled up in bed. :cross:

    Am I correct?
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    "Snuggle" is used informally, so I would allow for a wide range of expressions and I'd hesitate to call any of them ungrammatical if they're used by native speakers.

    I snuggled up in bed sounds unremarkable to me, though I'm not sure I'd know exactly what the speaker had in mind. I snuggled down (under the covers); I snuggled up (to my partner); I snuggled up in bed (under the covers, in something approaching the foetal position).
     
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