So-and-So Village

whitehorse11

New Member
English
Greetings,

Thanks you Cheryl Sui for suggestion of Yinxing Village.

Can I ask a question about how Chinese place names are constructed?

Village is Cūnlǐ, so Yingxing Village would be Yingxing Cūnlǐ ( I believe). Are they ever compressed as in England to one word? e.g Bradford, Bolton, Canterbury - i.e. two seperate words compressed into one place name?

In other words could the village be called Yingxingcūnlǐ ?

All advice is gratefully received.

Whitehorse.
 
  • SuperXW

    Senior Member
    Hi, Whitehorse!
    The most common equivalence of a "village" should be "cun1". (it's too hard to type ū, so I just type cun1.)
    Just use "ying2 xing4 cun1" here. "cun1 li3" sounds not correct.
     

    MèngDié

    Senior Member
    lǐ 里means inside, so cūnlǐ 村里 means in the village. As SuperXW correctly pointed out, lǐ should not form part of the name for the village. Yes you can compress Yin Xing into one word Yinxing. The cun (village) part is kind of redundant, but of course you can keep it depending on your preference. In English, would you just call a village Canterbury, or Canterbury Village?
     

    whitehorse11

    New Member
    English
    Thank you for your comments. Just to clarify 'bury' means fortified enclosure. So 'Canter' has been combined with 'bury' to form the city's name. The full explanation, just for the record is derived from the Old English Cantwareburh ("Kent people's stronghold").

    So that was the 'compression' I referred to.

    Many thanks again for your comments.
     

    SuperXW

    Senior Member
    Yes. In Chinese, we do have many compressions like Bradford, Bolton and Canterbury. :)
    石家庄 Shi1jia1zhuang1= Shi family's town, now a city. 青岛 Qing1dao1= Bluish island, now a city, 香港 Hong Kong = fragrant port, now, you know.
    xx屯/村 = ...village, xx堡 = ...fort, xx口 = ...cross, xx山 = ...mountain, etc.
    Inside a town, you may see more: ...brook, ...gate, ...tomb, etc.

    The basic unit for Chinese is "character", with each characters has their own basic meaning(s). Usually two to four characters form a word.
    In your example: yin2: silver, xing4: apricot; yin2+xing4: gingko, probably because its fruit looks like a white apricot.
    The cun (village) part is kind of redundant, but of course you can keep it depending on your preference.
    I think MengDie told you that cun1 is redundant because she didn't read your last post, and didn't know that the village is your creation, and it was named after the big tree. :)
    I must say that, "cun1" is necessary in your case, because "yin2xing4" is already the word for "gingko", without "cun1" people would definitely get confused.
    So, yes, you should merge cun1 into your village's name. :)
     
    Last edited:

    whitehorse11

    New Member
    English
    Thank you for all your comments.

    Can I ask one last question: why does Xi'an have an apostrophe in the centre?

    Whitehorse
     
    Last edited:

    SuperXW

    Senior Member
    why does Xi'an have an apostrophe in the centre?
    It's a note to remind people that, it's a city's name combained by two separate characters and two separate sounds. xi1 and an1. (xi1 means west and an1 means peace.) So when you pronounce Xi'an, there should be a pause in between.
    Because both i and a are vowels, without the apostrophe, people may think "xian" is a single character with only one syllable.
    In Chinese, we do have many single characters read "xian".
     
    Last edited:
    < Previous | Next >
    Top