so/as kind as

yakor

Senior Member
Russian
Hello.
Could one use "so" instead of "as"?
-You are so/as kind to me as your sister.
-You are kind to me as well as your sister.
-You are as kind to me as your sister is. (is it necessary to use "is"?)
 
  • lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    You are as kind to me as your sister [is] :tick:
    (Adding the is eliminates the risk of ambiguity: You are as kind to me as [you are to] your sister)

    you are so kind to me = you are very kind to me
     

    yakor

    Senior Member
    Russian
    you are so kind to me = you are very kind to me
    But could one say with this meaning
    -You are so kind to me as your sister is.=You are so kind to me as well as your sister is/does.(she is so kind too)
    Also,what about
    -You are kind to me as well as your sister is.=You are as kind to me as your sister is.
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    For some reason, “so” only sounds right in the negative:
    -You are so kind to me as your sister is. :thumbsdown:
    -You are not so kind to me as your sister is. :tick:

    The “as well” version is not idiomatic either.
     

    yakor

    Senior Member
    Russian
    For some reason, “so” only sounds right in the negative:
    -You are so kind to me as your sister is. :thumbsdown:
    The “as well” version is not idiomatic either.
    You are as so kind as your sister.(maybe?)
    You are kind as well as your sister. (maybe)
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    You are as so kind as your sister :cross:
    You are kind as well as your sister :thumbsdown: (both sisters are kind)
    You are kind and so is your sister :thumbsup: :thumbsup:
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    It’s not a natural way to simply state that both sisters are kind. It implies that someone has suggested sister A is not as kind as sister B, and whoever is saying it is reassuring sister A that that’s not true.
     

    yakor

    Senior Member
    Russian
    It’s not a natural way to simply state that both sisters are kind.
    Yes, indeed. One just could say that both sisters are kind. It was my not quite successful example with "kind" and "sisters":)
    He was as strong as his brother.
    You are as strong as your brother is.
    He didn't know about it as well as others.
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    1. as....as....
    2. not as....as...
    3. not so....as... (okay in BE, barely okay in AE)
    4. so...that...
    4. so...! (in an exclamation, not a declarative sentence)

    1. You are as strong as William [is]. :tick:
    2. You are not as strong as William [is].:tick:
    3. You are not so strong as William is. (in BE, but not in AE)
    4. You are so strong that you can lift this easily.:tick:
    5. Wow! You are so strong!:tick:

    He didn't know about it as well as others.:cross:
    What does this mean? He didn't know about others? Others knew more about it?
     

    yakor

    Senior Member
    Russian
    He didn't know about it as well as others.:cross:
    What does this mean? He didn't know about others? Others knew more about it?
    Yes, it is ambiguous.
    -He didn't know about it as well as others didn't. (he and others didn't about it)
    -He didn't know about it as well as others did. (he didn't know about it while others knew)
    -He didn't know about it as well as about others. (he didn't know about it and others)
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    Sentence: He didn't know about it as well as others.

    1. He didn't know about it as well as others didn't. (he and others didn't know about it)
    2. He didn't know about it as well as others did. (he didn't know about it while others knew)
    3. He didn't know about it as well as about others. (he didn't know about it and others)
    Meaning 1 is incorrect.
    Meaning 2 is incorrect.
    Meaning 3 as very awkward with "as well as about others". More natural is "about it or about others".
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    He didn't know about it as well as others did.

    This is okay to mean that others knew about it better than he did – his knowledge was not as good as theirs.
     

    yakor

    Senior Member
    Russian
    He didn't know about it as well as others did.
    This is okay to mean that others knew about it better than he did – his knowledge was not as good as theirs.
    Yes, I get it. But the other sentence is wrong. I mean
    He didn't know about it as well as others didn't. (wrong in any case)
    What does this mean? He didn't know about others?..
    Why do you think so? How change the sentence He didn't know about it as well as others to get really He didn't know about others
     

    yakor

    Senior Member
    Russian
    You are as kind to me as your sister [is] :tick:
    (Adding the is eliminates the risk of ambiguity: You are as kind to me as [you are to] your sister)

    you are so kind to me = you are very kind to me
    Could one say "you are as kind as your sister" the way "you are such kind as your sister"?
    Sentence: He didn't know about it as well as about others.
    Meaning as very awkward with "as well as about others". More natural is "about it or about others".
    What about "He didn't know about it as well as about the rest.".
     
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    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I suggest you stop making up unnatural sentences now, since we’ve more than covered your original query – and a process of elimination is definitely not the best way to learn English. ;):):cool:
     

    yakor

    Senior Member
    Russian
    If you are asking if "you are such kind as your sister" makes sense, then no.
    Yes, I meant a way of saying "you are such kind as your sister" in way with using "such".
    What do you want this to mean? ("He didn't know about it as well as about the rest.")
    He didn't know about everything.=he didn't know about that(it) and he didn't know about (all) the rest. (Doesn't it pull on the idiom?)
     
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    heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Yes, I meant a way of saying "you are such kind as your sister" in way with using "such".
    Why do you insist on using 'such' here. It doesn't fit in this sentence at all.

    He didn't know about everything.=he didn't know about that(it) and he didn't know about (all) the rest.
    It still isn't clear.

    I'm guessing you might mean 'He knew as little about this as he knew about everything else.'

    (Doesn't it pull on the idiom?)
    What does this mean?
     
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