...so exhilarating as to be shot at without result

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eehsun

Member
Turkish
Could someone please explain what the following sentence means?

"Nothing in life is so exhilarating as to be shot at without result."
(Winston Churchill)

Thanks,
 
  • bibliolept

    Senior Member
    AE, Español
    I think he is literally referring to having someone shoot at you with a firearm without being hit (without result, in British English). Of course, he may have been using it in a figurative sense.

    Where did you find this, what is the context?
     

    eehsun

    Member
    Turkish
    Then, shouldn't the sentence have been constructed in this way?:

    Nothing in life is as exhilarating as to be shot at without result.




    When I saw the so + adj. + as to structure, I immediately thought of it in the same sense as in the following sentences (all sentences are randomly picked up from Google)

    "Why are people so stupid as to believe that cow farts cause ozone depletion?"
    "BP is not so stupid as to risk this kind of mess on purpose."
    "Hardly anyone is so ignorant as to allow his worst animals to breed."
    "And is the UK government so arrogant as to think that it can actually have any real impact on global warming by introducing green taxes, ..."



    My point is: If the point is making a comparison, shouldn't the as..as structure have been used instead of so..as?


    Thank you
     

    eehsun

    Member
    Turkish
    Thank you for your reply!

    It seems that I couldn't understand the sentence because I've got the whole sentence structure wrong.


    It was enlightening to see that "so" could be used in comparisons in a similar way to as..as .

    Thanks!
     
    Last edited:

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    We often do use "so ... as" = "as ... as" when the sentence is negative, eehsun.
     
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