so help me

lauraholl

New Member
english australia
used in a phrase like

if you touch it, so help me, i will hurt you

or

Bleed on the socks, but so help me.. If you bleed on Splinter Cell, we're gonna perform the Nutcracker

Saigne sur les chaussettes, mais alors aide moi... si tu saignes sur Splinter Cell, on va devoir jouer à Casse-Noisette
 
  • Kelly B

    Senior Member
    USA English
    I don't think the literal aide/aidez-moi fits here.

    The full form is so help me God, and it is essentially equivalent to I swear to you - je vous/te jure. Perhaps the natives will tell us if there are other translations that more closely match the English.
     

    geve

    Senior Member
    France, French
    I don't think the literal aide/aidez-moi fits here.

    The full form is so help me God, and it is essentially equivalent to I swear to you - je vous/te jure. Perhaps the natives will tell us if there are other translations that more closely match the English.
    Yes, je te jure works. Also: je te préviens.

    Si tu touches à ça, je te préviens, ça va barder.
    Si tu poses ne serait-ce qu'un doigt sur ce truc, je te jure que tu vas souffrir.
     

    Harry Batt

    Senior Member
    USA English
    En septembre, je vais faire le voyage à New York, Grâce à dieu. En anglais. In September I am going to make the trip to New York, so help me. idioms have the same meaning. Since we americans north of the Mason-Dixon Line don't say By the grace of god, we say "so help me," and let the Bible Belt folks retain by the grace . . . .
     

    Ael

    Senior Member
    Canada--English
    I always thought of By the Grace of God as meaning, God willing (as in, if God wills it so), rather than I swear it! as it seems to be meant in the original question.

    Obviously I'm not from the southern US, so I could be wrong...
    Ael
     

    Harry Batt

    Senior Member
    USA English
    As Geve pointed out the full form is << so help me God >> The God part is dropped by a lot of people and we might say most people if the question were settled in a sondage. If I were asked to explain Grâce à dieu to my 10 and 11 year old students, I would tell them that it means "so help me."
     

    lauraholl

    New Member
    english australia
    we don't use it like than in aussieland. that to me says thanks to god, byt the grace of god. i don't know, maybe it's a US thing
     

    ChiMike

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    I always thought of By the Grace of God as meaning, God willing (as in, if God wills it so), rather than I swear it! as it seems to be meant in the original question.

    Obviously I'm not from the southern US, so I could be wrong...
    Ael
    Yes, Elizabeth, by the Grace of God, Queen...etc. (and it's not quite the same as Will, it is a gift of Grace...), but it is not a form of oath.

    For that, one could have reference to the oldest document in sustained Old French, actually, lingua romana - proto-French:

    Pro deo amur et pro christian poblo et nostro commun salvament, d'ist di in avant, in quant deus savir et podir me dunat,

    Par l'amour de Dieu et pour le salut du peuple chrétien et de nous en commun, de ce jour en avant, en tant que Dieu me donnera le savoir et le pouvoir,

    For the love of God and for the common salvation of Christian folk and of us, from this day forward, insofar as God shall give me wisdom and power...(i.e., so help me God)

    The oath of mutual assistance taken in Lingua Romana on 14 February 842 by Louis The German (Louis le Germanique) to his brother Charles (The Bald)(Charles le Chauve) at Strasburg (Charles took his in proto-francique).

    In the Middle Ages: Si M'Aïst Diex (Sic me adjuvet Deus): "Que Dieu me vienne en aide" (So help me God)
    http://www.citadelle.org/magazine.cfm;jsessionid=5630665654704a6a5fc1?mag_num=2&art_id=29&article=Si_M_aïst_Diex

    French Kings, such as Louis XIV, swore the "serment du royaume" in Latin: "Sic Deus me adjuvet" on the Gospels (les Évangiles - et non pas "la Bible")

    Coronation Oath (as enacted 1689), end:

    After this, the King and Queen laying his and her hand upon the holy Gospels, shall say,
    King and Queen, "The things which I have here before promised, I will perform and keep: So help me God."
    Then the King and Queen shall kiss the book.

    Oath of Allegiance, Canada

    Serment d'allégeance
    Moi, X , je jure (déclare) fidélité et sincère allégeance à Sa Majesté la Reine Elizabeth Deux, reine du Canada, à ses héritiers et successeurs.
    Ainsi Dieu me soit en aide.​

    (Strangely, despite the inclusion of "déclare," the addition at the end makes this form unacceptable to most nonjurors from religious belief.)

    So, you are right, there is a difference between "par la Grâce de Dieu" and the oath: So help me God (Que Dieu me vienne en aide)
     
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