''so that'' with passive voice subordinate clauses

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ullas84

Senior Member
turkish
I heard that ''so that'' should not be used with passive voice subordinate clauses

For example;

Active voice: I called a painter so that he would paint my house.

Passive voice:I called a painter so that my house would be painted.

İs the passive voice version correct grammatically and idiomatically or as I heard, this sentence is not supposed to be made ?
 
  • PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    Ah! "Active verb" has two meanings.

    1. Active, (=not passive) -> this is not what the teacher meant. He meant ->
    2. Active (also known as a dynamic verb") not stative. -> the main stative verb is "to be".

    Active verbs describe an action - I jump; stative verbs describe a state -> I am happy.

    Adverbs cannot be used with a stative verb - this is the point that he was making.

    Passive voice:I called a painter so that my house would be painted. :tick:
     

    ullas84

    Senior Member
    turkish
    *I called a cleaning company so that my house would be clean :cross:

    *She had a plastic surgery so that she would be more beatiful :cross:

    Am I right?
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    Am I right?
    No. You have not understood.

    I called a cleaning company so that my house would be clean. :tick:

    She had a plastic surgery so that she would be more beautiful. :tick:

    The teacher is making an unimportant point. You can ignore it. He uses "a "be" verb" and an "active" verb. He means "a stative verb" and a "dynamic verb" - see #4 above.

    He makes the point that adverbial clauses (the "so that" clause) cannot qualify stative (to be) verbs - the "to be" verbs are in the first or main clause.

    He does not mention the passive at all.
     
    Last edited:

    ullas84

    Senior Member
    turkish
    I think, now I understood it.

    a)I was a hardworking student so that I would be able to join Oxford University:cross:

    b)I studied hard so that I would be able to join Oxford University :tick:

    I hope I am right this time ?
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    Hmm...
    I think, now I have understood it.
    No, not quite. The word following the verb "to be" must be an adjective (like "smart".) And example of this being wrong would be:

    I was happy so that I would be able to join Oxford University. <- this does not tell me (i) why you were happy, not why being happy enabled you to join Oxford University; it is also grammatically wrong.

    The teacher is simply making the point that adverbial clauses cannot qualify the verb "to be".

    Jill is smart so all the boys like her :tick: -> adjectival clause of result
    Jill is smart so that she can beat the boys :cross: ->adverbial clause of purpose (An adverb cannot qualify "to be".) -> Jill is smart because that makes her able to beat the boys... :cross:
    Jill studies regularly so [that] she can beat the boys -> adverbial clause of purpose. (An adverb can qualify an active/dynamic verb.)
     

    ullas84

    Senior Member
    turkish
    I habe been searching for some additional information about ''adverb clauses'' since we talked about it.

    and I have found some extra information;

    An adverb clause is a dependent clause that modifies a verb, adjective or another adverb. It usually modifies the verb.

    Adverb clauses are introduced by subordinate conjunctions including after, although, as, as if, before, because, if, since, so that, than, though, unless, until, when, where, and while. These are just some of the more common ones.

    Example: They arrived before the game had ended. ("before the game had ended" is the adverb clause modifying the verb arrived telling when.)

    According to that information and the things you wrote before , I think I have some problems about understanding it.

    According to these informations ,I think these sentences are not gramatically correct.

    1a)He is still in love with her although she is not a nice person :cross:( because ''although'' tries to modify ''is'' and it is not an active verb and ''although she is not a nice person '' is an adverb clause )

    1b)He is a good man because he is always kind to animals :cross: ( because ''because'' tries to modify ''is'' and it is not an active verb and ''although she is not a nice person '' is an adverb clause)

    1c)He is a good man because he behaves kindly to animals :cross:( because ''because'' tries to modify ''is'' and it is not an active verb and ''although she is not a nice person '' is an adverb clause)

    and these versions of the sentences are correct

    2a)
    He loves her although she is not a nice person :tick:( because ''although'' tries to modify ''loves'' and it is an active verb)

    Am I right ?
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    According to this informations information ,I think these sentences are not grammatically correct.
    Information is never used in the plural: it is strongly uncountable.

    They are all fine.
    although she is not a nice person tells you more about "her" and is adjectival.
    because he is always kind to animals tells you more about "he" and is adjectival.
     
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