<So!> There tha’rt bare again, nowt but a bare-arsed lass an’ a bit of a Lady Jane

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longxianchen

Senior Member
chinese
Hi,
Here are some words from the novel Lady Chatterley's Lover(page 338, chapter 15) by Lawrence (planetebook,here):
(background: in the previous paragraph, Lawrence wrote: He fastened fluffy young oak-sprays round her breasts, sticking in tufts of bluebells and campion: and in her navel he poised a pink campion flower, and in her maiden-hair were forget-me-nots and woodruff……)

And he took the leaves from her hair, kissing her damp hair, and the flowers from her breasts, and kissed her breasts, and kissed her navel, and kissed her maiden-hair, where he left the flowers threaded. ‘They mun stop while they will,’ he said. ‘So! There tha’rt bare again, nowt but a bare-arsed lass an’ a bit of a Lady Jane! Now put thy shimmy on, for tha mun go, or else Lady Chatterley’s goin’ to be late for dinner, an’ where ’ave yer been to my pretty maid!’

I feel Mellors said a bit of Lady Jane because he regarded Connie's Lady Jane(her genitals) as something small(=a bit of Lady Jane). But how should I understand "so" please? I guess Mellors let the flower stay in her pubic hair for a time, then he took them off. And then say "so". Therefore, I rephrase the sentence this way:
now without the flowers(=so!)! You are naked(=bare) again, (there is) nothing(=nowt), except a small sexual organ

Is that right please?
Thank you in advance
 
  • Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    Once more, does that make any sense.
    The term 'Lady Jane' is not simply a reference to her genitals. It's used here to represent Connie as an entirely sexual being, the embodiment of 'cunt' used in the full sense of that term, basic natural woman, or, some might say, woman as a sexual object.

    There's no need to guess about Mellor taking the flowers off her pubic hair. As already explained, he said they had to stay in her pubic hair until they dropped off. ('They must stay there as long as they want', to paraphrase the dialect.) The flowers represented her sexuality, but only a small part of it/them remain,' a bit of it' a few of them. Without the flowers, like crowns symbolising her sexuality, she's just an ordinary naked woman (lass).

    You're right about 'So,' being used as a sort of interjection, like 'Right,' or 'Now,' to start a sentence when a job's been finished.
     

    longxianchen

    Senior Member
    chinese
    Thank you
    It's used here to represent Connie as an entirely sexual being
    However, I only saw a being, never saw a bit of being.:) Of course, we often say a bit of something. That's why I presumed Lady Jane here refers to her genitals
    he said they had to stay in her pubic hair until they dropped off
    In that case, Mellors had to wait until they dropped, which would take him a long time.But I feel Connie needed to return immediately for dinner, in case others found her fairs with Mellors.
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    he said they had to stay in her pubic hair until they dropped off
    Haha! :D What I wrote does sound a little as if it was her pubic hairs that had to drop off except I would have said until it dropped off. The pronoun 'they' obviously refers to the plural 'flowers'.


    In that case, Mellors had to wait until they dropped, which would take him a long time.But I feel Connie needed to return immediately for dinner, in case others found her fairs affair with Mellors.

    Are you arguing that Mellors did take the flowers off her pubic hair? He said he was leaving them there. What has that got to do with Connie going home for dinner? She would be wearing clothes. She could have taken them off herself had she wanted.
     

    longxianchen

    Senior Member
    chinese
    Are you arguing that Mellors did take the flowers off her pubic hair?
    Yes, I did. But now your She be wearing clothes reminds me that her action of wearing made the flower drop
    Haha! :D What I wrote, does sound a little as if it was her pubic hairs that had to drop off except I would have said until it dropped off. The pronoun 'they' obviously refers to the plural 'flowers'
    I knew they refers to the flowers.

    What confuse me most is so and a bit of Lady Jane. Now I have known so elicits the result of flowers dropping off her body. But I'm still confused about the collocation of a bit of and a person
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    So! There tha’rt bare again, nowt but a bare-arsed lass an’ a bit of a Lady Jane!
    So! you are naked again, [and when you are naked,] you are nothing more than a naked and ordinary young woman with a slight hint of being a lady from the upper classes!"

    In this speech, Mellors is reflecting Lawrence's view (that has earlier been expressed by Connie) that, shorn of their social status, their belongings, and their clothes, people are all the same regardless of class and wealth.

    "Lady Jane" probably refers to Lady Jane Grey who for only nine days was Queen of England and who was revered as a religious martyr and, thus, a perfect example of ladylike behaviour and conduct.
     
    Last edited:

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    'Lady Jane' is the nickname given to Connie, her genitals firstly and by extension to her persona, her whole self as a fully sexual woman. It's the part of Connie's nature that has nothing whatsoever to do with "ladylike behaviour." Maybe Jane was chosen because it's such a common name. The name given to unknown often dead females in the USA is Jane Doe . Jane also sounds like John also an extremely common name. I once went to a dinner party where all six men were called 'John'.

    In the same way, Mellors refers to his penis as 'John Thomas'. Later in the novel, he uses this name as if it was his real own name.

    There's no problem in English about referring to parts or bits or aspects of people's personality.

    He's part genius, part idiot.
    For an intelligent woman, you are a bit of a fool.
    I like him, but he's a bit too stupid for me.

    Connie has to change back into her Lady Chatterley role. She needs to tidy herself up a bit.
    Mellors helps her do this, but he leaves the flowers in her pubic hair as a symbol, a part, a bit, of the 'Lady Jane' persona.
     
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