So there's that

Discussion in 'English Only' started by Loob, Jul 2, 2009.

  1. Loob

    Loob Senior Member

    English UK
    I was intrigued by this comment in another thread (sorry xqby:()

    Is "so there's that" a common expression where you are?
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 2, 2009
  2. GreenWhiteBlue

    GreenWhiteBlue Senior Member

    The City of New York
    USA - English
    It may not be common, but it isn't odd.

    Bill: How can we afford to throw a party for everyone in our club?
    Joe: Well, my uncle is a beer distributor, and will give us a huge discount on beer, so there's that. I don't know what we will do for food, though.
     
  3. bibliolept

    bibliolept Senior Member

    Northern California
    AE, Español
    It depends. I'm not sure if "so there's that" means "so, that's that"—in which case I'd consider "so there's that" an unidiomatic form in AE—or if it means "so that is one point to think about"/"so that's one data point"/"so there is one thing to take into consideration"—in which case it does sound more idiomatic to me.
     
    Last edited: Jul 2, 2009
  4. xqby

    xqby Senior Member

    Oxnard, CA
    English (U.S.)
    Almost none of the discussions on this forum can be concluded with "so that's that," I think.
    Biblio's second set of paraphrases sounds about right: I was just adding a different view to the discussion.

    I wouldn't say it's particularly common even in my own vocabulary. These things just pop out every now and then.
     
    Last edited: Jul 2, 2009
  5. kalamazoo Senior Member

    US, English
    It's common but it's something that you barely think about when you say it either. It's generally in the context of ticking off some set of pros, or cons, to some activity or event. I think it's short for "so there's that to consider" or something along those lines.
     
  6. Redshade Banned

    UK
    English.
    This would be understood and is quite often used in the vernacular in the north of England in the sense as given by GWB and Kalamazoo.
     
  7. Loob

    Loob Senior Member

    English UK
    Thanks for assuaging my curiosity, everyone:)
     
  8. redgiant Senior Member

    Cantonese, Hong Kong
    Background: This conversation is taken from the comments on a news article, which is about a wildfire caused by an injured and lost hiker who tried to build a signal fire to invite rescue workers.

    After reading this thread, I guess "There's that" in this case means "Your view is reasonable. It's one thing to take into consideration". Am I right?
     
  9. Sparky Malarky

    Sparky Malarky Moderator

    Indiana
    English - US
    Yes.
     
  10. cyberpedant

    cyberpedant Senior Member

    North Adams, MA
    English USA, Northeast, NYC
    That's what I would understand.
     
  11. heypresto

    heypresto Senior Member

    South East England
    English - England
    So that's that then :D
     
  12. suzi br

    suzi br Senior Member

    Cheshire
    English / England
    I use it quite a lot. Until you mentioned it I had never reviewed my use, but I see I use it to acknowledge someone else's point of view, it is about considering ideas usually. But it can also be to acknowledge a joke, or a criticism.

    Useful little phrase in my book. It has surprised me that you were curious about it, Loob. Do you not use it yourself?
     
  13. redgiant Senior Member

    Cantonese, Hong Kong
    "So there's that" in the following context seems to be an example of the use you're referring to.

    Here's the pros and cons of a computer game laid out in a post. (Origin is one of the digital distribution services that most game players find intrusive and unnecessary, so I guess it's one of the cons.) What I want to know is does "So, there's that." only refer to Origin or all the things the poster has pointed out in the post?
     
  14. heypresto

    heypresto Senior Member

    South East England
    English - England
    I'd say it only refers to 'Origin'. "So there's the fact that it requires Origin to consider, as well as it being a good idea to use or buy a controller".
     
  15. Loob

    Loob Senior Member

    English UK
    Hi suzi:)

    Sorry not to have responded before: to acknowledge the relevance of a comment, I use "there is that" (with emphasis on the "is"), but not "so there's that".

    Maybe it's a regional thing....
     
  16. cyberpedant

    cyberpedant Senior Member

    North Adams, MA
    English USA, Northeast, NYC
    An old friend of mine used to say "there's that" to the point of saturation, but never a "so."
     
  17. ewie

    ewie Senior Member

    Elsewhere
    English English
    I suspect I use it to saturation point too, though it usually goes Well yeah, there's that.
     
  18. cyberpedant

    cyberpedant Senior Member

    North Adams, MA
    English USA, Northeast, NYC
    For what it's worth, last night Rachel Maddow (TV commentator) pronounced the entire phrase "So there's that" during her program. My heart still pounds.
     
  19. redgiant Senior Member

    Cantonese, Hong Kong
    Source: Haven, Season 1 Episode 3

    Background: Ray didn't know that his music was causing insanity among people within hearing distance. Dr Lucassi, who had been helping the police with the investigation, became the latest victim when he ran into Ray playing guitar. He kidnapped Ray to his labs, strapped him down and was about to cut open his head. Police officers Nathan and Parker were going inside the labs to find them. Parker wondered Lucassi, though presently insane, was trying to use Ray's ability to help his patients.

    Hi, I was wondering if "then, there's that" is more in line with "yeah, you've got a point there" /"that is one point to think about"
     
    Last edited: Sep 28, 2012
  20. ewie

    ewie Senior Member

    Elsewhere
    English English
    :thumbsup: "Yes, that's a point we have to take into consideration" kind of thing.

    (You watch some really grisly telly, RG:eek:)
     
    Last edited: Sep 28, 2012
  21. PeterPT

    PeterPT Senior Member

    Portuguese - Portugal
    Well, I guess old threads are always new and the door's always open:p

    I came across with "so there's that" too.

    The context:

    The Agent B is a dirty cop, he killed civilians and he was envolved in a big conspiracy.
    Agent A is the good cop.

    •••••••

    The dialogue between them after the dirty acts:

    Agent A: So was it all worth it?

    Agent B: I don't know.
    No.

    Agent A: Well, T.J.'s finally safe.
    He's back with his girl
    and his kid, so there's that.

    Agent A: I know you and your boys were
    sent in to kill T.J. and his unit.

    Conclusion:
    "so there's that" in this case would mean? "at least" (related to the question on the first line)
    or "after all" or "problem solved"

    Any ideas?
    Thanks in advance
     
  22. PaulQ

    PaulQ Senior Member

    UK
    English - England
    To me "So there's that" = And that is one good thing to come out of the incident/event/episode, etc.
     
  23. PeterPT

    PeterPT Senior Member

    Portuguese - Portugal
    PaulQ, Thanks, that's what I thought, too.
     

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