So thin that he is

Daniela P.

Member
Italiano
Hello,
I found this sentence in the book I'm reading. I'm not sure I understood what it means.
The book is a thriller, a man has been killed and the inspector is trying to find out the motive. He doesn't believe that the victim - a Parsi secretary - has been murdered for love and he asks his colleague:

"Nobody is going to kill that long stick of a Parsi because he has ravished their daughter, are they? Do you think he has been stabbed by a jealous mistress, so thin that he is she would have want to be embraced by a basket of wires?"

I supposed that by saying "long stick" he means that the victim was thin. So I thought that the second sentence - "so thin that he is... - means that he was too thin for the mistress to want his hugs.

Am I right?
 
  • ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    Hullo Daniela.
    Yes, a long stick is a tall, skinny person.
    Are you sure you've copied the second sentence correctly? ~ it's not grammatical and doesn't make any sense:eek:
     

    Daniela P.

    Member
    Italiano
    Hello ewie, many thanks!
    Sadly I've copied it correctly :( That's why I can't understand it :confused:
    By intuition, what do you think it means?
     

    ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    Difficult to say, really. He's obviously being likened to a basket of wires (skinny, hard things) ...

    I think what he's saying is, "Do you think any sane woman would want to be his mistress or even be embraced by him?" i.e. it's highly unlikely that he would be killed by a jealous mistress, because he'd never have a mistress.

    Is the speaker an Indian ... or something else?
     

    ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    Maybe, or maybe it makes perfect sense in Indian English, which is a bit of a law unto itself, with grammar I've never been able to fathom:cool:
     
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