So, we meet again

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SugarSpunSister

Member
Spanish- Argentina
Hello! I'm currently studying Translation and I have to work with an article of the Economist about the Greek crisis. Its name is "So, we meet again." I want to know if this is some kind of idiomatic phrase that I don't know or if it only refers to two people meeting again.
Thanks in advance! :)
 
  • The Newt

    Senior Member
    English - US
    I would call it more of a cliché than an idiomatic phrase. The literal meaning is exactly what it sounds like, but it might often be used to create an atmosphere of drama (or melodrama).
     

    sorry66

    Senior Member
    English, England
    ' 'til we meet again', 'we'll meet again' and 'so we meet again' feature in lots of films, books and songs as significant dialogue and as titles.
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    If you read the first two paragraphs of the article, which was published on July 11, you'll find that in this case, the title was intended literally: It refers to the euro-zone summit that had taken place on July 7 and new discussions that were scheduled for July 12.
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    It's a cliche, as others have said. The Economist is very fond of puns and wordplay in its titles. It would be recognised as such by most readers, even though it's literally about the leaders meeting again.
     

    Ivan_I

    Banned
    Russian
    Guys, is it possible to use another verb than "meet"?

    So, we work again! (in the same shift for example)
    So, we study talk again! (we talked yesterday)
    etc.
     

    The Newt

    Senior Member
    English - US
    Guys, is it possible to use another verb than "meet"?

    So, we work again! (in the same shift for example)
    So, we study talk again! (we talked yesterday)
    etc.
    I wouldn't do it. It's not an idiom that particularly lends itself to variations.
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    So, we work again! Not idiomatic, and my mind wouldn't go to the cliched phrase, "So, we meet again".

    So, here we are again. This could be used in a variety of situations.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    When people use "So, we meet again" they are consciously referencing a famous movie line. It's very recognizable and is part of the common English-speaking culture.

    So we talk again and so we study again are not famous or recognizable. They actually don't even make a lot of sense. "So we meet again" has an element of surprise to it (from the word "so"). It suggests it wasn't planned. There's suspense because we don't know what will happen next. In the James Bond context, it usually means someone is going to try to kill someone else very soon. "So we study again" is missing all of that.
     
    Last edited:

    Ivan_I

    Banned
    Russian
    When people use "So, we meet again" they are consciously referencing a famous movie line.
    OK. But it made its way to the movie somehow, hence it had existed before the movie. Do you think that there is the only verb (which is meet) is used in "Se, we ..... again!"?
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    You might be able to parody it if you sit down to dinner with someone you haven't had dinner with in a long time and say "So we eat again." That might be recognizable as a play on the famous line.
     

    lentulax

    Senior Member
    UK English
    I'll have to recreate that "James Bond atmosphere
    Good luck with that! Actually, I'd call 'So, we meet again' a catch-phrase rather than an idiom , and catchphrases are untranslateable (unless two countries share the cultural artefact which is the source, and the words have become a catch-phrase in both countries, perhaps in original and translated versions). Catch-phrases are a curious phenomenon ; virtually everyone uses them, and we seem to get pleasure simply from using them and hearing them used by others; they are often used in incongruous situations, to which we respond with amusement, and their use may involve some sort of play on words.

    I would not be surprised, for example, if someone had written an article about Boris Johnson headed 'Oooh, you are awful... but I like you!' This is the catch-phrase of a British comedian - I don't remember which, though I remember the catch-phrase) . So, very frequently, the original circumstances of use have little or nothing to do with the later use of the catch-phrase; I don't think that the James Bond atmosphere has anything to do with what the Economist writer had to say about the Greek crisis, and I think any effort to create a James Bond atmosphere would be wasted, since the point lies entirely in the shared recognition of a catch-phrase applied in an unexpected context.
     

    lentulax

    Senior Member
    UK English
    OK. But it made its way to the movie somehow, hence it had existed before the movie
    The words existed; in this order, they would not have been commonly heard; people weren't constantly saying 'So, we meet again.'

    Actually, I've always felt 'So, we meet again' has a slightly Germanic or foreign flavour (Blofeld was German, Goldfinger Latvian), but I know little German and no Latvian, so maybe that's just my imagination.
     

    Ivan_I

    Banned
    Russian
    The words existed; in this order, they would not have been commonly heard; people weren't constantly saying 'So, we meet again.'
    I am not talking about (the) words. I meant that the usage of the present simple in this phrase must have been used before its appearing in the movie. Or do you think that it was deliberately (or accidentally) created only for that movie?
     
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