So, we meet again

SugarSpunSister

Member
Spanish- Argentina
Hello! I'm currently studying Translation and I have to work with an article of the Economist about the Greek crisis. Its name is "So, we meet again." I want to know if this is some kind of idiomatic phrase that I don't know or if it only refers to two people meeting again.
Thanks in advance! :)
 
  • The Newt

    Senior Member
    English - US
    I would call it more of a cliché than an idiomatic phrase. The literal meaning is exactly what it sounds like, but it might often be used to create an atmosphere of drama (or melodrama).
     

    sorry66

    Senior Member
    English, England
    ' 'til we meet again', 'we'll meet again' and 'so we meet again' feature in lots of films, books and songs as significant dialogue and as titles.
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    If you read the first two paragraphs of the article, which was published on July 11, you'll find that in this case, the title was intended literally: It refers to the euro-zone summit that had taken place on July 7 and new discussions that were scheduled for July 12.
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    It's a cliche, as others have said. The Economist is very fond of puns and wordplay in its titles. It would be recognised as such by most readers, even though it's literally about the leaders meeting again.
     

    Ivan_I

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Guys, is it possible to use another verb than "meet"?

    So, we work again! (in the same shift for example)
    So, we study talk again! (we talked yesterday)
    etc.
     

    The Newt

    Senior Member
    English - US
    Guys, is it possible to use another verb than "meet"?

    So, we work again! (in the same shift for example)
    So, we study talk again! (we talked yesterday)
    etc.
    I wouldn't do it. It's not an idiom that particularly lends itself to variations.
     
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