social service

bg1996

Senior Member
Cantonese,Mandarin;Kwangtung/Guangdong,hk
"Majority of toilets are locked and require a RADAR key --available from Social Service departments or may be purchased from Burnham-on-Sea or Cheddar Tourist Information Centres."

Is it right that "Social Service" is used here? I usually read "social services" in many places, then it can replace "Social Service"?
 
  • icecreamsoldier

    Senior Member
    New Zealand English
    "Social services" is a collective noun phrase, denoting all services of this kind. In "Social Service departments," "Social Service" is a modifier (i.e. acting as an adjective) of "departments," specifying the type of departments in question.

    Generally speaking, however, one can talk about "a social service," such as "post-trauma counselling is a social service."
     

    Singinswtt11

    Senior Member
    English since birth, Spanish shortly thereafter
    "The Mmajority of toilets (bathrooms would be more idiomatic, at least here in the US) are locked and require a RADAR key --available from Social Service departments or may be purchased from Burnham-on-Sea or Cheddar Tourist Information Centres."

    Is it right that "Social Service" is used here? I usually read "social services" in many places, then it can replace "Social Service"?
    That's my only suggestion, other than that it looks fine.
     

    Lis48

    Senior Member
    English - British
    The context is England, so you would use toilet rather than bathroom or people will assume you are talking about bath and shower facilities. Bathroom is an AE term for toilet. In BE, it seems more natural to me just to say "from Social Services" leaving out the word department.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top