socially handicapped

coconutpalm

Senior Member
Chinese,China
These schools are enormously beneficial to socially handicapped children.
What does it mean by "socially handicapped"?
I understand it pretty well if "socially" is cut out, but ...
Do the children have difficulty in communicating with others?
 
  • mjscott

    Senior Member
    American English
    Yes. People who are socially handicapped feel uncomfortable in social situations, or they have never learned to interact with others in appropriate ways. An example would be someone with particular forms of autism (the author Temple Grandin comes to mind). Because of the way her brain worked, she was never socially aware of others around her, their feelings, and her own position in a social situation. This made her socially handicapped.

    By the way, Temple Grandin overcame some of her social handicap. Although her brain works differently (she is almost considered a savant when working with animals), she has gone on to get a doctorate, teaches at a prestigious veterinary college and has authored books. Even though she has overcome obstacles, she still has a social handicap.
     

    Ed the Editor

    Senior Member
    coconutpalm said:
    These schools are enormously beneficial to socially handicapped children.
    What does it mean by "socially handicapped"?
    I understand it pretty well if "socially" is cut out, but ...
    Do the children have difficulty in communicating with others?
    Coconutpalm,

    This term appears in Principle 5 of the United Nations' "Declaration of the Rights of the Child" (1959).

    Here is the sentence in English:

    "The child who is physically, mentally or socially handicapped shall be given the special treatment, education and care required by his particular condition."

    And in Spanish:

    "El niño física o mentalmente impedido o que sufra algún impedimento social debe recibir el tratamiento, la educación y el cuidado especiales que requiere su caso particular."

    Going back to 1959 for a term like this may be risky, but it appears to me that "que sufre algún impedimento social" (changing "sufra" to "sufre") would still be an acceptable translation for "socially handicapped."

    Hope this is helpful.
     
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