Sociedad Anónima Unipersonal

Remediosbuendia

Member
English - United States
This term is part of the name by under which the company appears in an official registration document:
“Escuela Andaluza de Salud Pública, Sociedad Anónima Unipersonal”.

Would the term "incorporated" (Inc.) work here?
 
  • David

    Banned
    Andaluza School of Public Health (a Single-Shareholder Corp.)

    I think because this is an odd form of corporation, it might be better to transl literally rather than use an abbrev that implying it is org in a form other than what it is...
     

    Remediosbuendia

    Member
    English - United States
    I agree. This kind of terminology can often lead to certain confusion so I have settled on the following phrase:

    Official notary registration of the company, Andalusian School of Public Health, a limited public company under sole proprietorship.

    Thanks for your input.
     

    litiga8or

    Senior Member
    Rainy Oregon! USA
    Another option would be "Professional Corporation" (abbreviated "PC") or "Limited Liability Company" (abbreviated "LLC"). These are corporate forms for a single person.

    There is a difference between a company/corporation and a sole proprietorship. Generally, in a sole proprietorship, the owner has to pay the debts if the company goes broke. In an LLC or PC, the owner doesn't have that obligation.
     

    David

    Banned
    Official notary registration of the company, Andalusian School of Public Health, a limited public company under sole proprietorship.

    It is not a "notary registration," the company is not the Andalusian School, but rather the Escuela Andaluza, and it appears not to be a Limited Liability Company (which is not a corporation), and a sole proprietorship is not a corporation either.
     

    Remediosbuendia

    Member
    English - United States
    David,

    Thanks so much for all your input. And just in case you're interested, let me fill in a few more blanks to give you a clearer picture of how the school was constituted.

    The sole proprietor of the Escuela Andaluza is, in fact, the Treasury Department of the regional Andalusian regional government. The start-up capital came from the government but a signficant portion of our income is generated by providing services to external clients. In Spain, where the public sector is bound by strict administrative rules and regulations (that make it difficult to procure services or hire and fire personnel) the statutes that govern the school provides the regional authorities with an institution that can "bypass" bureacratic rules and regulations that "handicap" many of the state's existing civil service agencies. Hope this doesn't bore you....and my sincere thanks for your help.

    “Memorandum Recording Partnership Compacts of the Commercial Company, Escuela Andaluza de Salud Pública, Sociedad Anónima Unipersonal ["Andalusian School of Public Health, a limited public company under sole proprietorship "--Trans.]
     

    David

    Banned
    I am sure your translation will be fine. However, there is such a thing as overtranslating. Where a Sociedad Anónima Unipersonal exists as a form of corporation organization, which of course it does not in every jurisdiciton, it seems to me the task is to translate what is, not what might be in another jurisdiction. A Sociedad Anónima is a Corporation by definition: Anónima refers to the whole idea of protection from liability for the proprietors: they are anónimos, protected. If General Motors goes under, and I own 1 share, I am not liable for the unpaid debts of the corporation; though an owner, I am anónimo. That is the difference between a corporation and a proprietorship. A Limited Liability Company is not a corporation; it is a proprietorship, but proprietors are also protected by "limited liability". This is not the place for a lecture on commercial law, BUT: if such thing as a Sociedad Anónima Unipersonal exists in local law, it seems to me the term should be translated in terms that reflect the original meaning. I also believe you should NOT translate the name of a company: United States Steel, Inc. is not Acerero Estadounidense, S.A." It is "United States Steel, Inc." Ditto: the Escuela Andalusa de Salud Pública. You might translate the name in brackets, with quotes, for informational purposes, but The Andalusian School of Public Health, a limited public company under sole proprietorship DOES NOT EXIST. You can't sue them. You can´t find their papers in the registro comercial. A translation is for the information of practitioners. I don't think it matters much for the translation whether the government owns the shares of a commercial company: our government just bought a majority interest in a bunch of banks, but they remain, legally, whatever form of corporation they were before the government bought their shares. So I still think Single-owner Corporation would more accurately reflect "Sociedad Anónima Unipersonal". I don´t know what it is, but it means something in the original that affects somebody's rights and liabilities!

    But in the long run, of course, nobody pays much attention to the details of a translation except pedants like me! Not sure why an S.A. in Andalusía would need to publish its documents in English, but presumably the English versions would not play much of a rôle in litigation.
     
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    Remediosbuendia

    Member
    English - United States
    Good listeners like me DO pay attention to these kinds of things think that "meticulous" is an infiniitely more complementary description of your talent than "pedant", however, this is not the forum for such a debate. It' was wonderful to read someone interested and informed enough to help me through the maze of terminology.
     
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