Soda + too much + fizz

Xavier da Silva

Senior Member
Hello everyone,


Is it natural/correct to use "fizz" (= sparkle, bubbles as a result of carbon dioxide added - my definition) and "too much" (quantifier) in the example I made below?

''The Brazilian Coca Cola has too much fizz.''

Meaning intended (context): they add too much carbon dioxide to it and it tastes too strong.

Thank you in advance!
 
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  • Glenfarclas

    Senior Member
    English (American)
    That sounds fine to me. (Of course there are other ways to say it, such as "... is too carbonated".) Note that if you are just talking about Brazilian Coca-Cola in general, then you should not use the definite article: "The Brazilian Coca-Cola..."
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    ''The Brazilian Coca Cola has too much fizz.'' is idiomatic but: "they add too much carbon dioxide to it and it tastes too strong." There is nothing to indicate that the fizz makes it taste too strong.

    You would normally say

    Meaning intended (context): "It has too much added carbon dioxide." (with the implication that this makes it unpleasant to drink.)

     
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