'Some fruit is rough.' or 'Some fruits are rough.' ?

lucy_zs

Member
Mandarin-China
We are taught here in China that fruit is an uncountable noun in most circumstances. But you can say '...tropical fruits, such as bananas and pineapples...' if you emphasize different kinds of fruits.


However, I find the following sentences in a textbook(Oxford English Shanghai edition):
'There are many kinds of fruits around us. Some fruit is rough, such as pineapples and oranges. Some fruit is hard, such as apples and pears.'

To me, it should be 'There are many kinds of fruits around us. Some fruits are rough, such as pineapples and oranges. Some fruits are hard, such as apples and pears.'

Which is correct?
 
  • Glasguensis

    Signal Modulation
    English - Scotland
    Both are correct. If you use the uncountable version you are talking about individual pieces of fruit, whereas if you use the countable version you are talking about varieties of fruit.
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    The mistake, to me, is the mismatch between There are many kinds of fruits around us and Some fruit is rough/Some fruit is hard.

    I think the writer should have been consistent: either kinds of fruit + some fruit or kinds of fruits + some fruits.

     

    lucy_zs

    Member
    Mandarin-China
    The mistake, to me, is the mismatch between There are many kinds of fruits around us and Some fruit is rough/Some fruit is hard.

    I think the writer should have been consistent: either kinds of fruit + some fruit or kinds of fruits + some fruits.
    Thanks!
     
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