some meanings which I can't make sure

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sola

Member
chinese
hi, here is a whole paragraph from a book I am reading just now,
and I got confused about this "shose" thing,

"goodness knows that sufferings I imagined went with them" to me means:
my goodness knows that if I bring my shose with me to the hell, this is so bad to do this to my shose.

and for “Well, there’s a yes and a no: either you behave yourself, or get used to walking barefoot.”
the point i didn't get is if "behave yourself" is for going to the heaven, and "get used to walking barefoot" is for going to the hell?

thank you very much everyone!


<<...>>
At times, from her look, I had the impression of seeing, like a bird’s wings fluttering up from a trap, the madness of Donna Concettina. By now she knew many things about religion and she used to talk about hell, which I didn’t believe in. Whenever I did anything wrong, my mother would say, “You’ll go to hell with your shoes on!” and I was a little worried, primarily because of the shoes: goodness knows that sufferings I imagined went with them. Once I asked Don Paolo, who smiled and replied, “Well, there’s a yes and a no: either you behave yourself, or get used to walking barefoot.”
 
  • panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    [...]
    At times, from her look, I had the impression of seeing, like a bird’s wings fluttering up from a trap, the madness of Donna Concettina. By now she knew many things about religion and she used to talk about hell, which I didn’t believe in. Whenever I did anything wrong, my mother would say, “You’ll go to hell with your shoes on!” and I was a little worried, primarily because of the shoes: goodness knows that sufferings I imagined went with them.
    Her mother was threatening that she would go to hell - and what's worse, she would go to hell with her shoes on.
    As a child, she was very worried about this additional threat.
    She wonders, as an adult, what additional sufferings whe imagined she might have to endure if she went to hell with her shoes on.
    I don't think it has anything to do with what might happen to her good shoes.
    Once I asked Don Paolo, who smiled and replied, “Well, there’s a yes and a no: either you behave yourself, or get used to walking barefoot.”
    I don't understand this sentence either.
    It suggests Don Paolo is saying: be good, because if you don't, you will have no shoes. Yet the girl's mother said she'd go to hell WITH her shoes if she was bad.
    Puzzled.
    Perhaps he's suggesting she could escape from going to hell by taking her shoes off - and the shoes would go to hell by themselves.
     

    ireney

    Modistra
    Greek Greece Mod of Greek, CC and CD
    About the second sentence: Could it possibly be the following?

    To avoid going to hell with your shoes on you have two alternatives: a) be good (so as not to go to Hell with or without any footwear) b) don't wear any shoes (so even if you are not good and end up in Hell at least you won't wear shoes).
     
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