'Some/no article' to mention a plural noun for the 1st time?

Tenacious Learner

Senior Member
Spanish
Hello teachers,
I found the following definition:
We use some or no article to mention a common plural countable or an uncountable noun for the first time.
Is there a reason to use 'some' or 'no article' at all, to mention a common plural countable or an uncountable noun for the first time?
Examples:
I need some batteries for my camera. I need batteries for my camera.
I called for some information. I called for information.

Thanks in advance.
 
  • Tenacious Learner

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    Hi Cagey,
    I'm sorry. I really don't know where I took it from. It was with my personal papers this definition.

    TL
     
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    owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    Both versions - I called for information, I called for some information - are common.

    I tend to use "some" if I'm thinking about a number or amount of something: I want some batteries. = I want a few batteries/I want a number of batteries. If I'm not thinking about "a number/amount of something", I usually use the noun without "some."
     

    Tenacious Learner

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    Hi owlman5,
    Thanks! OK. So it just has to do whether you want to mention "the number/amount of something" or not; right?

    TL
     
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    wolfbm1

    Senior Member
    Polish
    I think that when you say, 'I need batteries for my camera.', you identify what you need. Batteries, not something else.

     

    owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    That's how it works for me, TL. If I tell somebody that "I called for some information", I am thinking about "an amount of information." If I tell somebody that "I called for information", then I don't have the idea of "amount" in my thoughts.
     

    Tenacious Learner

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    That's how it works for me, TL. If I tell somebody that "I called for some information", I am thinking about "an amount of information." If I tell somebody that "I called for information", then I don't have the idea of "amount" in my thoughts.
    Hi owlman5,
    Crystal clear!:thumbsup:

    TL
     

    wolfbm1

    Senior Member
    Polish
    I wonder if a native speaker views this the way I do.
    Anyway, I got the idea from Scott Thornbury's article, in his blog, entitled 'A is for Articles (1)'.
    He uses the terms:
    "generic <or general>, indefinite"
    and
    "specific, indefinite".
    I think the former term applies to your sentence: I need batteries.

    It's good to know that Owlman interprets the pronoun "some" as "a number/amount of something."
    WIKIPEDIA says that <
    the word "some" can be used as an indefinite plural article.> Source: Article (grammar).

    Maybe the word "some" in the sentence 'I need some batteries.' functions as an indefinite plural article and as a quantifier which limits the number of batteries somewhat.
    I took this idea from JeffSahol's answer to the question 'Why does English have an indefinite article?' on this website.
     
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