some of them <being?> the result of past misuses [missing verb?]

park sang joon

Senior Member
Korean
A deep mistrust of science and technology is expressed by many in our society today. Were it to prevail, this sense of suspicion and frustration could result not only in our failure to solve our present crises,
some of them the result of past misuses of technology, but also in our future inability to deal with problems we may not even be in position to predict.

I think in the inserted phrase in bold, 'are' is omitted after the word 'them'; if not, I can't understand the structure of the phrase at all.
Please help me; thank you in advance for your help.
 
  • mplsray

    Senior Member
    A deep mistrust of science and technology is expressed by many in our society today. Were it to prevail, this sense of suspicion and frustration could result not only in our failure to solve our present crises,
    some of them the result of past misuses of technology, but also in our future inability to deal with problems we may not even be in position to predict.

    I think in the inserted phrase in bold, 'are' is omitted after the word 'them'; if not, I can't understand the structure of the phrase at all.
    Please help me; thank you in advance for your help.
    What has been (deliberately) omitted is "being": "some of them being the result of past misuses of technology." To use "are," you would have to write "some of which are the result of past misuses of technology."
     

    entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    No, if you inserted a finite verb, the clause wouldn't be connected with the preceding one. You'd need this:

    . . . could result not only in our failure to solve our present crises, and some of them are the result of past misuses of technology, but also in . . .

    However, the original clause is equivalent to one with a non-finite verb, and you could also turn that into a preposition phrase, again equivalent in meaning:

    . . . could result not only in our failure to solve our present crises, some of them being the result of past misuses of technology, but also in . . .
    . . . could result not only in our failure to solve our present crises, with some of them being the result of past misuses of technology, but also in . . .
     

    park sang joon

    Senior Member
    Korean
    Thank you both for your concrete answer.
    Why did the author arbitrarily omit the important word 'being' before the noun phrase, not an adjective?
     

    mplsray

    Senior Member
    Thank you both for your concrete answer.
    Why did the author arbitrarily omit the important word 'being' before the noun phrase, not an adjective?
    Although I said the word "being" was deliberately omitted, I'm not sure that is accurate. What the author wrote is quite natural, and it is certainly possible that he did not even consider using "being" in the clause.
     

    George French

    Senior Member
    English - UK
    Thank you both for your concrete answer.
    Why did the author arbitrarily omit the important word 'being' before the noun phrase, not an adjective?
    park sang joon,

    As a matter of interest what is the source?

    GF..

    And how should any of us know why the author omitted a word? The author would/might know that.
     

    park sang joon

    Senior Member
    Korean
    Thank you both for your answer and opinion.

    As a matter of interest what is the source?
    The book I'm reading have been published in only Korea and the texts extracted came from very old English newspapers or magazines, so we can't search anywhere for the texts.

    A deep mistrust of science and technology is expressed by many in our society today. Were it to prevail, this sense of suspicion and frustration could result not only in our failure to solve our present crises,
    some of them (being) the result of past misuses of technology, but also in our future inability to deal with problems we may not even be in position to predict.

    I have seen participle phrases that the word 'being was omitted before an adjective so many times but before a noun for the first time.
    Please, Could anybody explain this to me?
     
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    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    I have seen participle phrases that the word 'being was omitted before an adjective so many times but before a noun for the first time.
    Please, Could anybody explain this to me?
    Because there is a first time for everything:D
    Just add it to the list of structures, some of them quite rare, that you have learnt in English.
     

    park sang joon

    Senior Member
    Korean
    Thank you, JulianStuart, for your answer.

    The phrase 'some of them quite rare' is the abbreviation of 'some of them being quite rare', isn't it?
    Anyway, what do you mean by 'some of them'?; Are you saying such structures sparsely seen, including such a thing as shown in my question?
     
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    donovanwmike

    New Member
    English - United States
    The phrase "some of them the result of past misuses of technology" is sort of an aside to provide a bit more definition. I would have used parenthesis:
    Were it to prevail, this sense of suspicion and frustration could result not only in our failure to solve our present crises (some of them the result of past misuses of technology), but also in our future inability to deal with problems we may not even be in position to predict.
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    Thank you, JulianStuart, for your answer.

    The phrase 'some of them quite rare' is the abbreviation of 'some of them being quite rare', isn't it?
    Anyway, what do you mean by 'some of them'?; Are you saying such structures sparcely seen, including such a thing as showed in my question?
    It is not an abbreviation, nor did I "deliberately" omit the verb. It is a construction where you can imagine "filling in the verb" if it helps you to understand how the structure arose. You can also think of it as a simple ellipsis (from dictionary.com)
    ellipsis
    •the omission from a sentence or other construction of one or more words that would complete or clarify the construction, as the omission of who are, while I am, or while we are from I like to interview people sitting down.
    •the omission of one or more items from a construction in order to avoid repeating the identical or equivalent items that are in a preceding or following construction, as the omission of been to Paris from the second clause of I've been to Paris, but they haven't.
     

    park sang joon

    Senior Member
    Korean
    Thank you, JulianStuart, for your kind reply :)
    The ellipsis that you have used have nothing to do with the two usage of the ellipsis you have quoted.
    I'd like to know some more about your usage that "you can imagine filling in the verb"; please help me.
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    Thank you, JulianStuart, for your kind reply :)
    The ellipsis that you have used have nothing to do with the two usage of the ellipsis you have quoted.
    I'd like to know some more about your usage that "you can imagine filling in the verb"; please help me.
    Ellipsis is not restricted to the examples in my post. Those are only examples. The structure (adding something like "some of them quite rare" between commas as a parenthetical comment) is the structure and it can go before an adjective or a noun.
    There is an extensive discussion of ellipsis in wikipedia where you can learn more about the usage if you wish to master the details:D - covering
    Types of ellipsis
    Gapping
    Stripping
    Verb phrase ellipsis
    Pseudogapping
    Answer ellipsis
    Sluicing
    Nominal ellipsis
    Comparative deletion
    Null complement anaphora
    Less studied ellipses
    Theoretical challenges
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    Ellipsis is the process of omitting something from a sentence because it is already understood and is not necessary to keep it for communicating the desired sense. Thus, you feel there is a hole in the sentence where something is missing. When you put that word (or words) back into the sentence, you are filling that hole.
     

    park sang joon

    Senior Member
    Korean
    Thank you, JulianStuart, very much !!
    I suppose I haven't seen your usage in the written English; Is your usage used in the written English?
    In any chance, Could I get the link your usage is accounted for?
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    Thank you, JulianStuart, very much !!
    I suppose I haven't seen your usage in the written English; Is your usage used in the written English?
    In any chance, Could I get the link your usage is accounted for?
    Please explain clearly what you mean. Which usage are you referring to??
    Are you asking about a structure like this: "You can imagine asking a question."?
     

    park sang joon

    Senior Member
    Korean
    Thank you, JulanStuart, for your continuous replies.
    I know a pronoun or 'there' with auxiliary verb or the verb 'be' is omitted often and only 'be' with a subject existing rarely, but I don't know a general verb can be omitted; I don't say about repeated words in a compound sentence.

    Please explain clearly what you mean. Which usage are you referring to??
    Are you asking about a structure like this: "You can imagine asking a question."?

    (It is) The ellipse I have to deduce an omitted verb as in "some of them quite rare", you said "some of them quite rare" is not a participle phrase.
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    ... you said "some of them quite rare" is not a participle phrase.
    I said no such thing. When I said in post 11 "it is not an abbreviation" that does not mean I said "it is not a particple phrase". (You can ask a grammar specialist if a phrase without a participle can still be called/considered a "participle phrase":D)

    We do not 1) think of a phrase with a verb in and then 2) "deliberately omit" the verb. We simply don't think of the verb at all. We (native speakers) just use the structure. How you analyse it (and what technical terms you use) to help you understand it is up to you.
     

    park sang joon

    Senior Member
    Korean
    Thank you, JulianStuart, for your continuous replies without abandoning me.
    I said no such thing. When I said in post 11 "it is not an abbreviation" that does not mean I said "it is not a participle phrase".
    Does your remark mean you have used a participle phrase?

    So can I omit a general verb also?
    If I post the thread about this them, Could I get various opinions enough helpful for me to understand your usage?
    In any chance, could you give me some examples for the question?

    I am absolutely desperate to understand your usage.
     
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    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    It's not MY usage. It is the one in the original sentence you asked about. Entangledbank gave a good explanation all the way back in post #3. Please re-read that. As for the "participle phrase" issue, I'll just repeat "(You can ask a grammar specialist if a phrase without a participle can still be called/considered a "participle phrase":D)" I am not a grammar specialist so I am not qualified to answer that question.

    (Please use the "Reply with quote button" when you wish to quote someone else's text - don't just copy it and use bold text - that is very confusing because we don't know whose text you are quoting. If you wish to quote multiple posts in one reply, use the + button next to the "Reply with quote" button, at the bottom right of each post you wish to quote from - you can edit the text you don't want to quote. Thank you)
     
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    park sang joon

    Senior Member
    Korean
    Thank you, JulianStuart, for your quick reply.
    But I don't know the usage yet and I have posted another thread to know the behind truth.
    I hope you answer the thread also.
     
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