some or any

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macriscri

Member
Italian - Italy
" Do you want some tea ?" . " No, thank you . Is there ANY (or SOME ?) coffee? " . I don't understand if the last sentence is just a question to know if there's some coffee (requiring ANY) in order to ask for it or if it's a way to ask for coffee such as " Can I have ...please " ( requiring SOME) .
Thanks a lot
FRom Italy
 
  • PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    "Do you want some tea?"
    "No, thank you. Is there ANY coffee?":tick:

    "Do you want some tea ?"
    "No, thank you. Is there SOME coffee?":tick: less formal

    Any = "a quantity of" (at least a single example from amongst all things of that type) e.g. "Are there any cars on the road?" = "Is there a single car on the road."
    Some = "a quantity of" (a number of examples from amongst all things of that type) "Are there some cars on the road?" = "Is there more than one car on the road."

    In your example, any and some both fit - "Is there at least a single cup of coffee? and "Is there enough coffee for a cup?"
     

    taraa

    Senior Member
    Persian
    "Do you want some tea?"
    "No, thank you. Is there ANY coffee?":tick:

    "Do you want some tea ?"
    "No, thank you. Is there SOME coffee?":tick: less formal

    Any = "a quantity of" (at least a single example from amongst all things of that type) e.g. "Are there any cars on the road?" = "Is there a single car on the road."
    Some = "a quantity of" (a number of examples from amongst all things of that type) "Are there some cars on the road?" = "Is there more than one car on the road."

    In your example, any and some both fit - "Is there at least a single cup of coffee? and "Is there enough coffee for a cup?"
    Can you please explain the difference between these two?
    1. He refused to eat anything.
    2. He refused to eat something.
     

    london calling

    Senior Member
    UK English
    Organizasyon konusunda en etkili şekilde hizmetlerimizi sunmaya devam ediyoruz. Bu kapsamda sizlere sağlamış olduğumuz hizmetleri ve hizmet çalışmalarını burada değerlendirebilir ve istekleriniz doğrultusunda firmamız ile çalışmaya başlayabilirsiniz. Aliskan Organizasyon . com
    Really???
     

    taraa

    Senior Member
    Persian
    The difference is that we don't say (or let's say I can't think of a context in which I would say this)

    2. He refused to eat something.

    Where did you find this?
    Thank you so much!
    The first sentence is in "Grammar in Use by Murphy". I changed "anything" to "something" for the second sentence.
     

    Linkway

    Senior Member
    British English
    A: Why was the child reprimanded?

    B: He refused to eat something.

    A: What was it?

    B: Raw cabbage. He ate everything else on his plate, but wouldn't eat the cabbage.

    Both of the sentences you asked about are good, but only 'something' works in the above dialogue. 'Anything' would be wrong because he did eat other items on his plate.
     
    Last edited:

    taraa

    Senior Member
    Persian
    A: Why was the child reprimanded?

    B: He refused to eat something.

    A: What was it?

    B: Raw cabbage. He ate everything else on his plate, but wouldn't eat the cabbage.

    Both of the sentences you asked about are good, but only 'something' works in the above dialogue. 'Anything' would be wrong because he did eat other items on his plate.
    Good example. Thank you very much!
     
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