Some say that bubble tea was first served at a street stand in Taipei in the 1980s.

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kenny4528

Senior Member
Mandarin, Taiwan
Hi,

Some say that bubble tea was first served at a street stand in Taipei in the 1980s.

This comes from ''Summertime Treats''.

I have seen in the 1980s used in the articles many times, and I assume that without the in this context is also appropriate. Am I right?

Thanks.
 
  • daviesri

    Senior Member
    USA English
    I was always taught to write it as 1980's with the apostrophe. I was taught that without the apostrophe is incorrect. I could be wrong though.
     

    kenny4528

    Senior Member
    Mandarin, Taiwan
    I was always taught to write it as 1980's with the apostrophe. I was taught that without the apostrophe is incorrect. I could be wrong though.
    Interesting. In fact, the original sentence comes from a Teaching-material written by native-speaker. Now that you mentioned it, I am eager to know why they always use 1980s instead of 1980's?
     

    liliput

    Senior Member
    U.K. English
    I've seen both "the 1980's" and the "1980s". I know that some people believe it's correct to use an apostrophe, but personally I can see no reason for it, since it's neither a contraction nor a possesive.
     

    kenny4528

    Senior Member
    Mandarin, Taiwan
    Not at all. See, I deleted my post.
    Apparently it's more correct with the apostrophe, though it seems to be used wihtout it.
    In short, I don't know. :eek: :)
    You are of great help, as are daviesri and liliput.

    I learned something new today.:)
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    I've seen both "the 1980's" and the "1980s". I know that some people believe it's correct to use an apostrophe, but personally I can see no reason for it, since it's neither a contraction nor a possesive.
    An online Concise Oxford Companion to the English Language explains apostrophes used with decade dates as the "apostrophe of plurality", and says the usage is fading away. (The same "apostrophe of plurality" is found with letters: "He can't pronounce t's.")

    My AE reference prefers the form without the apostrophe: the 1980s.
     

    liliput

    Senior Member
    U.K. English
    An online Concise Oxford Companion to the English Language explains apostrophes used with decade dates as the "apostrophe of plurality", and says the usage is fading away. (The same "apostrophe of plurality" is found with letters: "He can't pronounce t's.")

    My AE reference prefers the form without the apostrophe: the 1980s.
    I find it easier to conprehend the use with letters, "ts" could be easily mispronounced, whereas "t's" is clearer. Frankly it seems like a bit of a botched job to the problem, I thin I'd prefer; "He can't pronounce the letter t" or maybe "He can't pronounce 't's".
     
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