some scrambled egg VS some scrambled eggs

magic dragon feeders

Senior Member
Japanese
Would you answer my question? Thanks in advance.

A: "I want some scrambled egg."

B: "I want some scrambled eggs."

What's the difference? Both sentences are of my own making for the question.
 
  • suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    Lingo is right, but in your context: really, no-one cares!

    One egg doesn’t really make a good serving.

    In a restaurant, whichever you said, you’d be understood. I often order this food and I honestly cannot recall if I say egg or eggs. It matters so little. If they serve this dish, they’d always use more than one egg.
     

    entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    If you drop some on yourself as you're eating, it's some scrambled egg (a relatively small quantity). Here the plural would make it sound like you'd dropped all or most of the plateful.
     

    Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    I only ever ever use "scrambled egg". Other people I hear appear to use only "scrambled eggs". Whatever name you use for the dish is probably what you would use with "some", irrespective of the quantity.

    I, for instance, might eat tinned peaches (always plural in my vocabulary). If I spill some, I would say that I had spilled some tinned peaches, even though it would almost certainly be only a small fraction of a single peach.
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    A: "I want some scrambled egg." -> "scrambled egg" - this is the name of the dish - "egg" is uncountable and expresses an indefinite and amorphous quantity of the generic item.

    B: "I want some scrambled eggs." -> eggs (as individual items) that have been scrambled.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    B: "I want some scrambled eggs." -> eggs (as individual items) that have been scrambled.
    This is generally the American default for the name of the dish.

    But if I spilled a small part I might possibly say scrambled egg in that context.
     

    GreenWhiteBlue

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    Since I generally use at least two eggs when I make the dish, I would say I made some scrambled eggs for breakfast. However, if after running the pan in which I cooked the eggs through the dishwasher I noticed that it had not been properly washed, I would then say There's still some scrambled egg on the bottom of the pan.
     

    RM1(SS)

    Senior Member
    English - US (Midwest)
    Since I generally use at least two eggs when I make the dish, I would say I made some scrambled eggs for breakfast.
    :thumbsup: :thumbsup:
    However, if after running the pan in which I cooked the eggs through the dishwasher I noticed that it had not been properly washed, I would then say There's still some scrambled egg on the bottom of the pan.
    I would just say "There's still some egg on the bottom of the pan."
     

    boozer

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian
    There is this fashion in my language as well. They sell tomatoes or peaches but they label them as 'tomato' and 'peach'. I hate it. :)

    'I want some scrambled egg' actually made me laugh - not only will you put up with a single egg, but any old and scrambled one, left there by chance, will do. That's modesty in its purest! :D
     

    magic dragon feeders

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    Thank you all for your sincere answers. But too many answers! I'm a bit confused.
    There seems to me a slight regional difference.

    Now I'll form an opinion of mine referring to your answers.

    I think if you use plural eggs to make them scrambled, you call the cooked dish "scrambled eggs" and can say "I ate some scrambled eggs in the restaurant".

    I think "scrambled egg" means, as some of the responders say, an indefinite and shapeless quantity of the dish named scrambled egg, whatever the number of eggs used is.
    And I think the difference between "scrambled egg" and "some scrambled egg" is that
    the former means a generic item named "scrambled egg" and referring its amount doesn't make sense, while the latter is egg (scrambled egg) actually eaten or seen or touched, usually not so plenty.
    Right?

    As for my example A, I now find it a bit quaint. I shouldn't have used "some" in it.

    I think "Would you like some scrambled egg?" would be better.

    And as for B, "Would you make some scrambled eggs" would be better.

    OK?
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    I think the regional difference is that in AE we're likely to almost always use the s. Within BE there seem to be people who use the s and people who don't.

    I've noticed the same thing with the word potato in answers on here. We use the s with potato also in AE. "I'd like some more mashed potatoes." If they are not mashed but instead cubed then, "I'd like some more potatoes." At least some people (maybe most?) speaking BE would say "I'd like more potato."

    Here's a recipe I found online:

    How to Make Mashed Potato - Great British Chefs

    An American recipe would never say that.

    Whether those differences between egg and eggs are regional differences or personal differences within BE I don't know.
     
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