some time / sometime

learning_grenglish

Senior Member
India
Tomorrow I am going to London, but I will be there only for some time / sometime. I will move to France immediately.

Could you tell me which option is correct in this context?

To me, the both sound correct.

Please help me.
 
  • panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    Some time is correct - but the meaning is not consistent with your sentence.
    Tomorrow I am going to London. I will be there for some time. I don't know how long.
    Tomorrow I am going to London but I will be there only for a short time. I will move to France on Friday.
     

    timz

    Member
    Russian
    Hi, could you tell of any difference if both are correct? Is "ago" necessary here?
    "This movie was popular some time ago."
    "This movie was popular for some time ago."
    Thanks.
     

    bangla

    Member
    Bangla
    Tomorrow I am going to London, but I will be there only for some time / sometime. I will move to France immediately.

    Could you tell me which option is correct in this context?

    To me, the both sound correct.

    Please help me.
    Some time and Sometime both are correct in the sentence written above and the meaning of the two words is also the same.
    some time and sometime can be used as an adverb or an adjective.
    When it is adverb it means "at a time that you do not know exactly or has not yet been decided".
    When it is adjective it is used to refer to what sb used to be.:)
     

    Fabulist

    Banned
    American English
    Hi, could you tell of any difference if both are correct? Is "ago" necessary here?
    "This movie was popular some time ago."
    "This movie was popular for some time ago."
    Thanks.
    The first sentence is standard, literate English, the second needs some modification.

    The first sentence means that the movie was popular at an indefinite time in the past, probably at least a few years (otherwise, one would use something like "recently"), but perhaps much longer ago.

    One may not just drop "for" into the first sentence. If the idea is that the movie was popular for an indefinite period of time, and that that period ended in the past, one could say:
    "This movie was popular for some time, several years ago."
    "This movie was popular for some time, shortly after World War II."
     

    brian

    Senior Member
    AmE (New Orleans)
    Some time and Sometime both are correct in the sentence written above and the meaning of the two words is also the same.
    some time and sometime can be used as an adverb or an adjective.
    When it is adverb it means "at a time that you do not know exactly or has not yet been decided".
    When it is adjective it is used to refer to what sb used to be.:)
    I would disagree. Some time is a noun phrase; quite simply, it's the noun time, modified by the adjective some. Sometime, on the other hand, is an adverb.

    Thus, some time will have the same distribution as other nouns (noun phrases), e.g. it will follow prepositions, whereas sometime will have the same distribution as other adverbs, e.g. it will modify adverbials. For example:

    (1) I will be there for 5 days. <-- "5 days" is a noun phrase
    (2) I will be there for some time. <-- so is "some time", therefore

    (3) I will arrive early tomorrow. <-- "early" is an adverb modifying "tomorrow"
    (4) I will arrive sometime tomorrow. <-- so is "sometime", therefore

    If you change (4) very slightly, then you can get back to some time:

    (4') I will arrive at some time tomorrow.

    Here, some time no longer modifies tomorrow; rather, it's the object of the preposition at, hence a noun phrase.

    Another easy diagnostic is: if it can be replaced by some hour, some day or any other such expression, then it should be some time:

    (2') I will be there for some days.
    (4'') I will arrive at some hour tomorrow.

    (4''') I will arrive some hour tomorrow. :cross:
     
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