someone for <whom> writing is harder than it is for other people

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Sercan

Member
Turkish
Hi,

Today, when I was reading the Charlie Kaufman's lecture which happened at the BAFTA 2011 awads and couldn't figure out the part where the quote has been said by Kaufman himself. The specific part of it is the word "whom."

"A writer is someone for whom writing is harder than it is for other people" -Thomas Mann

Is there some punctuation errors within the sentence or is it me? Thanks.

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  • Florentia52

    Modwoman in the attic
    English - United States
    I see no punctuation errors in the sentence. I'm not sure I understand the question implied in "couldn't figure out the part where the quote has been said by Kaufman himself." Could you clarify?
     

    Sercan

    Member
    Turkish
    OK. I'm trying. Can this sentence be: "A writer is someone who thinks writing is harder for a writer than other people" I know it looses its all aesthetics, but the word "whom" makes this quote a struggle for me.
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    Welcome to the forum, Sercan. :)
    "A writer is someone for whom writing is harder than it is for other people." -Thomas Mann
    I see no errors, punctuation or other, in that sentence. What part of it do you question?
     

    takiras

    New Member
    English - UK
    There's no error there - if I've interpreted your original post correctly, you're having problems with the whom. It's just a (optional) synonym of 'who' when it's used as an object of a verb or preposition.
    The meaning of the sentence is pretty much 'Writing is harder for writers than it is for others'.
     

    EStjarn

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    Can this sentence be: "A writer is someone who thinks writing is harder for a writer than other people"
    You have added the idea of thinking, which makes the paraphrase slightly incorrect. Perhaps you can see how 'whom' fits into the sentence by this:

    Writing is harder for a writer than it is for other people. One might therefore (jokingly) say that a definition of 'writer' is: someone for whom writing is harder than it is for other people.

    Also, consider this: Writing is hard for me. - For whom is writing hard? - For me.

    As is said above, 'whom' means 'who'. One uses 'whom', not 'who', after prepositions. 'For' is a preposition.
     
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    RM1(SS)

    Senior Member
    English - US (Midwest)
    There's no error there - if I've interpreted your original post correctly, you're having problems with the whom. It's just a (optional) synonym of 'who' when it's used as an object of a verb or preposition.
    The meaning of the sentence is pretty much 'Writing is harder for writers than it is for others'.
    I agree with takiras, except for his/her use of the word "optional." Whom is no more an optional synonym for who than him is for he.
     

    Sercan

    Member
    Turkish
    I agree with takiras, except for his/her use of the word "optional." Whom is no more an optional synonym for who than him is for he.
    Agreed. Whom isn't an alternative use of who. They're different as to why he/she and him/her aren't same.
     
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