someone pits someone against someone else"

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tufguy

Senior Member
hindi
Can we say "someone pits someone against someone else"? For example "John pitted Carl against Tim and Carl got into a fight with Tim."
 
  • Barque

    Banned
    Tamil
    You need to give context, Tufguy.

    What is it that you want to say? What's the situation in which you want to use this sentence?

    The rule on context is there for a reason. People can help you better if they understand what you're trying to say.
     

    tufguy

    Senior Member
    hindi
    You need to give context, Tufguy.

    What is it that you want to say? What's the situation in which you want to use this sentence?

    The rule on context is there for a reason. People can help you better if they understand what you're trying to say.

    John, Carl and Tim worked together. John didn't like Tim at all. So, he started pitting Carl against Tim. John told Carl that Tim was a very bad person, he didn't like Carl as well and Tim used to backbite about Carl. So Carl thought that whatever the John was saying was true and got into a fight with Tim."
     

    Barque

    Banned
    Tamil
    John tried to turn Carl against Tim. I wouldn't use "pit against" in this situation

    Earlier threads on "pit against" (you can find earlier threads, if any, on words and phrases by entering them in the search box):
    pit against
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    I agree with Barque.

    You could use "pit" in a more directly confrontational situation.

    John is a manager and the other two are in sales.
    John pitted Carl against Tim when he told them that whichever of the two made the most sales that month would receive a $100 bonus.

    The two are "fighting" over a specific thing. The "fight" for customers was directly engineered by John, whereas in your sentence it is an indirect result of John's having turned them against each other.
     
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